telling the sex?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by farmerPEEPS, Mar 24, 2013.

  1. farmerPEEPS

    farmerPEEPS Out Of The Brooder

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    hi-ya, so me and my dad plan to get 5-9 more baby chicks(we already have 6) and i want to know how to tell there sex....we're thinking of getting a black asstrulorp, sex-links, and i few more because my dad wants them all to be diffrent breeds...how do i tell the sex or convince him that roosters are ok???[​IMG]
    thanks
     
  2. farmerPEEPS

    farmerPEEPS Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 22, 2012
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    6 adult hens...
     
  3. my sunwolf

    my sunwolf Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sex links you can tell the sex at birth. Hatcheries and feed stores will have them sexed and separated into bins of male and female. There are red and black sex links. You can also get birds sexed from the hatchery at 90% accuracy.

    For adult hens, they will have rounded hackle and saddle feathers, whereas roosters will have pointed hackle and saddle feathers.

    A hen's rounded feathers:

    [​IMG]

    A rooster's pointed, shiny feathers:
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    If I understand your question correctly, you are going to get adult hens?

    Sexing adults is very obvious in the breeds you listed. Hens are slightly smaller, rounder, do not have "ornate" feathering on their necks and just before their tails. The adult rooster is proud, stands tall, is larger, has ornate tails, saddle feathers and have pronounced heads and combs. They also crow! LOL

    Here's a Rooster and a hen. Do you see the difference? It is very, very obvious in person. You might be taken aback when you see an adult rooster. They have huge feet, thick legs, and often stand half again as tall and weigh a few pounds more than their female counterpart.

    As for convincing your dad to get a rooster? Wow, that's a family situation you two will just have to talk through.


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    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  5. farmerPEEPS

    farmerPEEPS Out Of The Brooder

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    we have 6 adult hens and r getting babys but im confused on how to figure out which is the most broody sence they all sleep on roosts...:/
     
  6. fancyfowl4ever

    fancyfowl4ever Chillin' With My Peeps

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    if they are sleeping on their roosts at night none of them are broody. You will know when one is broody because she will sit in the nest 24/7, usually all fluffed up and growling and some even bite.
     
  7. farmerPEEPS

    farmerPEEPS Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 22, 2012
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    so i cant try and have them adopt chicks? they sit in the nest ALL day long but @ night they perch...is there a way to make them broody? im trying to get them to adopt some chicks im buying on saturday ....
    [​IMG]
     
  8. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    It's a rare hen that goes broody at the sight of chicks. I'd plan to brood them yourself. If a hen hears them and goes into a clucking broody march, I'd give her a go. But, more likely, chicks would be a curiosity and something to chase away from the feeder. If you're unlucky, they'd be perceived as a snack or a threat to be eliminated.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. goldfinches

    goldfinches Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you're planning to get chicks and you aren't allowed to have roosters, you're best to buy sex links.

    If you don't have a broody hen, please, have a brooder prepared so the chicks don't die.
     
  10. my sunwolf

    my sunwolf Chillin' With My Peeps

    This is definitely true, I have tried to stick adult hens in with chicks, and they will peck the babies (which can often cause death) and eat all the food and then try to get back to their flock. Often even a broody hen will do this even if you take the proper steps into "fooling her." So you need a brooder for your babies if you're going to get them.
     

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