Temperature and fertile duck eggs?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Kaolru, Apr 11, 2012.

  1. Kaolru

    Kaolru Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just the other day I found that my Khaki Campbell(I think) started laying again, but before I could collect them my dad accidentally stepped on all four. Then we had to catch the two East Indies that were being sold, and that stressed all the ducks out, so she quit laying for a couple of days. Now I found one again today, but I want to know how to find out if it's fertile or not. I have a Cayuga drake that is always with my two girls, but I know that doesn't guarantee fertile eggs from the start. Also, this egg was sitting out most of the day, and we had temperatures dip below freezing, will it still be viable for incubation, or should we just keep it for eating?

    Also, I think I've asked this before, but do you guys think an injured hen will lay? I only have one Cayuga hen, and her leg was broken as a duckling. It began healing too quickly for our vet to set it, so she limps, but is otherwise healthy. Will this stress her body to the point where she won't lay? She's almost a year old(so this will be her first breeding year), and to date I don't think she has laid once, and it's my understanding that they're supposed to lay at around six months. I'm pretty sure the one laying is my Khaki Campbell.
     
  2. Kaolru

    Kaolru Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have another question. I looked this up on my own, but I couldn't find an answer that suited the type of incubator I have. It's just a still air styrofoam bator that we used for quail eggs some years ago. My dad refuses to accept that we should get a better one, since this one still works, but oh well.

    Now, for this type of incubator, what should the temperature and humidity be during the main incubation period, as well as the three days prior to the scheduled hatch day? Also, I need something to measure humidity. I've heard of a digital hygrometer doing a good job. Would it be my best bet?
     
  3. Lute

    Lute Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My incubator is a Hovabator (new). I have my thermostat set to a temperature between 99-101 degrees and a humidity of 55%. But I keep reading from various sources the temperature should be as low as 97 (specifically for duck eggs). I can't get a consensus on this.

    The digital thermostat is this one from Amazon. I don't fill the incubator to full so it works for me.
    http://www.amazon.com/Display-Tempe...-Hygrometer/dp/B001AKCLVK/ref=pd_rhf_pe_shvl1

    Your "frozen" egg should be fine. I know a lady that's incubating eggs that had been frozen. My eggs that I accidentally refridgerated are incubating just fine (okay it was one of my roommates that put the carton in the fridge, not me).
     
  4. Kaolru

    Kaolru Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you very much. The eggs can sit for up to seven days outside the incubator and still be viable, right? This was just laid and I wasn't ready, so I'm getting everything all set up and making sure it's steady before putting the egg in. I would prefer to wait until she lays around seven or so eggs, but my father is anxious. [​IMG]

    I've heard the humidity is supposed to be higher than fifty, have you hatched duck eggs successfully with that low of a humidity? Just curious.
     
  5. Lute

    Lute Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've had eggs sit for 6 days before incubating, they are developing nicely. I think after 7 the fertility goes down.

    This is actually my first incubation but I will be raising the humidity to closer to 70% for lock down.
     
  6. nickie

    nickie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had a pekin with a bad leg, she limped, a lot. She wasn't a fantastic layer, but she did lay an egg a day during her season (which lasted from the time the weather turned warm until the weather turned cold). The limping shouldn't be a huge problem for her production in my experience.
     

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