Temperature for Rhode Island chicks

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Highpinesnow, May 22, 2010.

  1. Highpinesnow

    Highpinesnow New Egg

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    May 22, 2010
    Hello all...first post and glad ur here to help I hope.....Friend gave me week old chicks that are now guesing maybe month old and I live in S. Utah still bout 40-50 or alittle less degrees in morning. What do you think best or earliest warmestst temp to put outside without inside and a lamp?....Thanx for any help...... ohhhh never had chickens so sorry if dumb question
     
  2. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Welcome to BYC and there is no such thing as a dumb question.

    The general rule of thumb on temps. is 90-95 the first week, decreasing by 5 degrees a week until such time you are down to 70 degrees (end of week 5), at which time they should be feathered out enough not to need heat.
    The important thing to remember is to avoid taking them from a warm, cozy brooder and suddenly stick them outside without heat. It's best to wean them off the heat first.
     
  3. Highpinesnow

    Highpinesnow New Egg

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    May 22, 2010
    Quote:Thanks so much!....yep I did see the 90-95 and 5 degrees rule....still little snow under pines in shade so guess house guests till 70deg and thinking first couple weeks of June. also, I know to handle when this small but having hard time picking up to make gentle...any suggestions on best way to pick up and hold? only have 3 but they get alittle crazy when I reach in to feed and clean water......was told just go slow?...........Thanks again for youre help
     
  4. Highpinesnow

    Highpinesnow New Egg

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    May 22, 2010
    Ohhh....just saw thread just below mine "Handeling new chicks".....guess I could have searched around a bit and supose thats enough information.....dont mean to double post or anything.....thanx again
     
  5. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:Thanks so much!....yep I did see the 90-95 and 5 degrees rule....still little snow under pines in shade so guess house guests till 70deg and thinking first couple weeks of June. also, I know to handle when this small but having hard time picking up to make gentle...any suggestions on best way to pick up and hold? only have 3 but they get alittle crazy when I reach in to feed and clean water......was told just go slow?...........Thanks again for youre help

    Yep, it just takes time and patience. A little bit of treats can't hurt either, since the fastest way to a chicken's heart is through the stomach. Always bring your hand into the brooder "underhand", never reach from above. From above is the same way a predator would reach in to snatch one and chicks are instinctively afraid of things coming at them from above.
    Just sit and quietly talk to them and they will become used to you.
     
  6. Highpinesnow

    Highpinesnow New Egg

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    May 22, 2010
    Quote:Thanks so much!....yep I did see the 90-95 and 5 degrees rule....still little snow under pines in shade so guess house guests till 70deg and thinking first couple weeks of June. also, I know to handle when this small but having hard time picking up to make gentle...any suggestions on best way to pick up and hold? only have 3 but they get alittle crazy when I reach in to feed and clean water......was told just go slow?...........Thanks again for youre help

    Yep, it just takes time and patience. A little bit of treats can't hurt either, since the fastest way to a chicken's heart is through the stomach. Always bring your hand into the brooder "underhand", never reach from above. From above is the same way a predator would reach in to snatch one and chicks are instinctively afraid of things coming at them from above.
    Just sit and quietly talk to them and they will become used to you.

    Thanks didn't realise the predator aspect and makes perfect sense......Youre last sentence made me smile cause when my friend who has 16 chickens and got me into them and mine were so tiny I made noises at them and he callled me the "Chicken whisperer" (made me laugh).....one more question, is it normal for them to argue occaisionaly....and what kind of treats?...ok 2 ?.......Thank you for your time to all......
     
  7. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:Folks here on BYC are pretty divided on treats. Some say don't give them at all, others pile on treats from the first week. I reason that if mama bird was raising them she'd be taking them out and showing them all kinds of goodies to eat from week one.
    Some good treats to start with - chopped hard boiled egg (not really a treat, its the same thing that nourished the chick in the egg) and plain yogurt allowed to come to room temp. first. If you can get your hands on some crickets or mealworms, your chicks will think they have died and gone to heaven. Plus watching them catch the buggies is entertainment for you. [​IMG]
    Two things to keep in mind about treats - always try and keep the amount of treats down to no more than 10% of their daily intake. They really need the complete nutrition of their chick starter as babies. And second, don't be disappointed if they are afraid of their treats at first. Chicks are afraid of anything new added to their enviroment. They will act as if you are trying to poison them and will give you "stinkeye" as only a chicken can. Just leave the treats in with them for awhile. The bravest chick will soon get up the nerve to try them, the others will watch. Once the others see that braveheart didn't die a horrible death from eating the treat(s), it'll be a free for all. It helps to always use the same bowl to offer treats in; preferably a brightly colored one. They'll come to recognize that bowl.

    Yes play fighting, chest bumping, body slamming are all normal for chicks. It doesn't indicate that you have a bunch of cockerels. They start working on the pecking order from day one and play fighting is part of that.

    Good luck! [​IMG]

    Almost forgot - when you start adding harder consistency treats - such as bugs - the chicks are going to need grit to disgest them. If you take them outside at all during the day and put them on some ground that has small pebbles in it, they'll find their own grit. You can also buy grit specifically ground for chicks. If all else fails, walmart sells a parakeet grit that will work. Just be sure you get the kind without added calcium.
     
  8. Highpinesnow

    Highpinesnow New Egg

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    May 22, 2010
    Quote:Folks here on BYC are pretty divided on treats. Some say don't give them at all, others pile on treats from the first week. I reason that if mama bird was raising them she'd be taking them out and showing them all kinds of goodies to eat from week one.
    Some good treats to start with - chopped hard boiled egg (not really a treat, its the same thing that nourished the chick in the egg) and plain yogurt allowed to come to room temp. first. If you can get your hands on some crickets or mealworms, your chicks will think they have died and gone to heaven. Plus watching them catch the buggies is entertainment for you. [​IMG]
    Two things to keep in mind about treats - always try and keep the amount of treats down to no more than 10% of their daily intake. They really need the complete nutrition of their chick starter as babies. And second, don't be disappointed if they are afraid of their treats at first. Chicks are afraid of anything new added to their enviroment. They will act as if you are trying to poison them and will give you "stinkeye" as only a chicken can. Just leave the treats in with them for awhile. The bravest chick will soon get up the nerve to try them, the others will watch. Once the others see that braveheart didn't die a horrible death from eating the treat(s), it'll be a free for all. It helps to always use the same bowl to offer treats in; preferably a brightly colored one. They'll come to recognize that bowl.

    Yes play fighting, chest bumping, body slamming are all normal for chicks. It doesn't indicate that you have a bunch of cockerels. They start working on the pecking order from day one and play fighting is part of that.

    Good luck! [​IMG]

    Almost forgot - when you start adding harder consistency treats - such as bugs - the chicks are going to need grit to disgest them. If you take them outside at all during the day and put them on some ground that has small pebbles in it, they'll find their own grit. You can also buy grit specifically ground for chicks. If all else fails, walmart sells a parakeet grit that will work. Just be sure you get the kind without added calcium.

    Wow so much knowledge thank you! ummm "Stinkeye"? Yep prety skidish right now hope they get over it...Yes there are out of three a whinner a mellow one and one screems bloody murder when touched haha. When I reach in to feed they are basicaly my best friends. Friend who was farmer all life says heck their just for eggs no need to cuddle em" anyway thanks for info it helps so much at this point I apriciate it, also still 28 deg over nite and maybe 55 day so guess still roommates for awhile.....thanks again
     
  9. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Most folks are like your farmer friend - just have them for the eggs, no need to cuddle.
    However, I am assuming that you got your chickies for pets as well as the eggs, which are a nice bonus.
    My hubby was raised around commercial chicken houses his whole life and it still boggles his mind that (most) of my chickens come when called and are perfectly happy to be picked up and loved on.
    Good luck to you and Blessings! [​IMG]
     

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