Temporary electric fence

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by PuppyBantamCochin, Nov 6, 2010.

  1. PuppyBantamCochin

    PuppyBantamCochin Chillin' With My Peeps

    113
    0
    109
    Apr 19, 2010
    I'm thinking about getting a net-type electric fence for my goats and sheep so I can rotate them.
    What height should I get?
    Pros & cons?





    Thanks,

    F.V.
     
  2. BobwhiteQuailLover

    BobwhiteQuailLover Country Girl[IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.

    Sep 25, 2010
    Wisconsin
    3 or 4 feet, that should work
     
  3. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
    85
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Well there's the obvious -- shorter is easier for the stock, or dogs or coyotes, to go over if they want to. So shorter is more appropriate in situations where nobody is going to be highly motivated TO go over, and/or where it doesn't hugely matter if stock goes over (e.g. subdividing a field that has GOOD perimeter fencing)

    The shorter electronet you can just step over (being careful of your crotchal regions as you do it [​IMG]) whereas the taller stuff you really need to unhook the electric supply and/or have a 'gate' (e.g. where rolls join) to get thru without getting you zapped.

    The big issue to me is WIND. Because I live on a pretty windy property. I find the stuff I have, I forget if it is 45" or what but it's Premier's taller poultry electronet, is really really inclined to blow over (or just blow around to the point that sag develops and grounds the fence out too much for the charger). So I will be ordering a roll or two of the sheep stuff next spring and it will be the SHORTER stuff, what is it, 35"? So as to have less wind stress on the posts. OTOH if you live in a real sheltered location, that is probably not an issue.

    I really like the stuff btw (I only have the poultry net, which has many more verticals and a few more horizontals than the sheep/goat type net, but is otherwise basically the same and I *use* it mostly for the sheep). It really really IS as quick to set up and move as they say it is, providing you follow the directions (DO NOT ROLL IT UP, just fold into a drapey pleat from each post). However you also really really DO need to keep under the fenceline extremely mown-down, particularly if you do not have the most massive charger in the world; because even with the fence set up as tight as you can get it and all corners tied back to supplemental posts, it takes only the most *minor* amount of sag to put the bottommost charged strand on the ground.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  4. PuppyBantamCochin

    PuppyBantamCochin Chillin' With My Peeps

    113
    0
    109
    Apr 19, 2010
    We have a property with trees around most of it, so there is some windbreak i guess...I was thinking to go with a taller one because I have one goat who likes to jump.
    I was also wondering if I could use it in the winter, or if it would get affected by the cold & snow....



    thanks!
     
  5. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
    85
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Sounds like the taller version is what you want then.

    It won't work in snow (poor to no 'zap'), unless you get the more-expensive pos-neg stuff and you still may have to disconnect the lower (snow covered) live strands. I would really, really not recommend it for winter use. Also snow will drag it down.

    Pat
     
  6. michickenwrangler

    michickenwrangler To Finish Is To Win

    4,511
    15
    241
    Jun 8, 2008
    NE Michigan
    You are probably going to need at least a few strands for goats and sheep
     
  7. jerseygirl1

    jerseygirl1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    4,497
    16
    246
    Jun 20, 2009
    Orange County, NY
    I use one for my goats, absolutely love it. Once they get zapped, they never go back!
     
  8. PuppyBantamCochin

    PuppyBantamCochin Chillin' With My Peeps

    113
    0
    109
    Apr 19, 2010
    Thanks for all the responses! I really hope to get some to use from March to November...starting from next spring. I wonder how my goats will take to it....they'll probably give me ''WHAT???'' expressions:rolleyes:[​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by