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  1. curlybird

    curlybird Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 23, 2014
    Perth, Australia
    We are going to be building a coop soon and have started buying supplies, however we are unsure what type of wood we should be using. I was thinking treated pine would be fine but my husband is worried about the treated pine being poisonous to the chickens. We have termites near by in a big tree and the are also in the bush land, so they would most likely be an issue if didn't use treated pine.

    Is it safe to use a treated pine and then paint or varnish the wood?

    We have also thought of making a metal frame to lift the coop off the ground to deter termites and then using an untreated pine/wood.

    What are your thoughts?
     
  2. curlybird

    curlybird Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 23, 2014
    Perth, Australia
    Anyone?
     
  3. welasharon

    welasharon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 28, 2010
    North Florida
    I'm in Florida so we have to use treated wood. I don't use it though for roosts where they are going to be in contact with it...especially for prolonged periods of time.
     
  4. RonP

    RonP Chillin' With My Peeps

    A quick internet search revealed the following information.

    I think you will be fine.

    Quote:

    Chromated copper arsenate, or CCA, is a chemical compound mixture containing inorganic arsenic, copper and chromium that has been used for wood preservation since the 1940s. CCA is injected into wood by a process that uses high pressure to saturate wood products with the chemicals. CCA is intended to protect wood from dry rot, fungi, molds, termites, and other pests.

    On February 12, 2002, EPA Administrator Christie Whitman announced a voluntary decision by industry to move away from consumer use of arsenic-containing treated lumber products by Dec. 31, 2003. New alternative wood preservatives will be used instead.

    By Jan. 2004, EPA will not allow CCA products for virtually any residential uses, including wood used in play-structures, decks, picnic tables, landscaping timbers, residential fencing, patios and walkways/boardwalks.

    EPA has not concluded that CCA-treated wood poses unreasonable risks to the public for existing CCA-treated wood being used around or near homes or from wood that remains available in stores. EPA does not believe there is any reason to remove or replace CCA-treated structures, including decks or playground equipment. EPA is not recommending that existing structures or surrounding soils be removed or replaced.
     
  5. CrazyTalk

    CrazyTalk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 10, 2014
    CCA hasn't been available outside of specialty lumber yards for more than 10 years. You're not going to get it unless you go specifically looking or it.


    The stuff now is significantly less toxic (not that CCA was all that toxic). Most of the problems with CCA were of the "the public heard the word arsenic and freaked out" type. It'll be fine.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2014
  6. curlybird

    curlybird Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 23, 2014
    Perth, Australia
    Apparently you can still get CCA here... I did however find some arsenic free treated pine. Thanks for your help :)
     
  7. CrazyTalk

    CrazyTalk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 10, 2014
    You can still get it in any state, it's just not commonly used, and not rated for use in houses anymore. You have to look for it - that being said, it lasts longer than the newer stuff, and really isn't much more toxic. People are just inordinately afraid of the word arsenic.
     

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