Testing incubator ... Question

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by DMRippy, Aug 17, 2011.

  1. DMRippy

    DMRippy Pallet Queen Premium Member

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    When I last checked my homemade incubator the air temp was 100.4 and my homemade water wiggler says 100.8. It had been running too hot all night so I turned it down and it ran for two hours and that is what it was when I left. The real question is what temp do I go by and when is it really too high? Should I make the water wiggler 99.5 or 100 or is that close enough? I don't have eggs coming so no rush. My water heater thermostat is plastic can I drill it like I have seen to help the temps and it is forced air not still air. It is a cabinet with a homemade egg turner.

    Anything else you need?
     
  2. cornfed80

    cornfed80 Out Of The Brooder

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    i would say that that is pretty close to hatch chicken eggs. they might hatch slightly earlier than 21 days. for a homemade incubator that is very close im quiet impressed what does it cut off and on at?
     
  3. DMRippy

    DMRippy Pallet Queen Premium Member

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    I only watched one cycle but more than 100.5 and less than 100.9 is what it cut off at and I think more than 99.5 but less than 99.9 is when it came on. Either I got lucky or I read enough to know what to do to get the right temps. I will have a better idea tomorrow it records the high and low of both temps.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2011
  4. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    You're doing really well, so close to the optimum temperature. I don't know all your design details, so I can only tell you what I did to fine tune it.

    Ventilation holes, I drilled plenty for ventilation and fine tuning the temperature. Adjusting the setting of the WHT caused a bigger change than I wanted, either too high or too low. So I left it at the higher setting and opened some vent holes until temps stablized at 99-100. Perhaps a vent hole will provide the temp decrease that you need. Tape and untape the number of holes required to reach goal temp.

    Another thing I noticed was that the fan plays a part in the WHT registering the temperature. The WHT cycled much faster if the fan blows directly at the bulb and WHT; when I aimed the fan up (90 degrees) instead of straight ahead at the light, the cycling slooowwwweeeeed way down. Just my observation using a cooler. If the fan got knocked out of position, the temperature would rise and with in a few hours, I knew I had a problem. (I'm nerotic and check temps alot! Started with an LG!) I secured the fan well. Now it is VERY consistent.

    I also use heat sinks to mitigate any fluctuations; it buys me time to fix something before it drastically effects the eggs. I had a air temp spike of 108 and still hatched 14/24 eggs my first try.

    Keep trying, you'll get there! GL
     
  5. DMRippy

    DMRippy Pallet Queen Premium Member

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    Quote:I have an old kitchen cabinet. A light on either side with a fans directly under it at about 45 or 50 degree angle. The wht is really close to one of the lights. I will post pics tomorrow. I can put vents in. Is any location any better than another? High or low, near the lights or the fans? I have plenty of air gaps but I had not thought about regulating the temp with it. After I check it tomorrow, if it held steady, I will add vent holes. Thanks!
     
  6. DMRippy

    DMRippy Pallet Queen Premium Member

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  7. DMRippy

    DMRippy Pallet Queen Premium Member

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    I made some changes that may have made the incubator more air tight but had to be done. Even with a vent hole it was holding at 100.8/.9 so I opened all three. Any other suggestions or should I just run with it? What humidity is TOO LOW for dry incubation? The incubator is in a room that over the summer I had a mold problem so I have had to run a dehumidifier. I think the humidity in the incubator is dipping below 25% but not below 20% is that too low? I could put some water near the vent holes to keep the humidity a little higher. The dehumidifier is in a 1000 sf room and 20 feet away from the incubator. I could move one of them if that would be better. When the weather starts to change I will not need it, but it is still very much summer here!
     
  8. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    I made some changes that may have made the incubator more air tight but had to be done. Even with a vent hole it was holding at 100.8/.9 so I opened all three. Any other suggestions or should I just run with it?Having enough ventilation holes is important; I put my holes in the bottom and very low on sides and many along the top Plenty to leave open even if I need to cover some vent holwfor temp regulatingTightening up the incubator and eliminating leaks is a great way to control air flow and temp. It makes the vent hole all the more important.What humidity is TOO LOW for dry incubation? The incubator is in a room that over the summer I had a mold problem so I have had to run a dehumidifier. I think the humidity in the incubator is dipping below 25% but not below 20% is that too low? I could put some water near the vent holes to keep the humidity a little higher. The best way is to put the water for moisture INSIDE. Many different ways to do this. Set up a bowl with a straw running to the outside thu a vent hole and then syring the water in. OR place small wet sponges inside. One of the 2 biggest prroblems that I read about is shrink wrapping. The eggs do need enough moisture to be abl to pip and zip. A shrinkwrapped chick cannot move and needs assistance ( Many people ignore the admonishing "don't help" advice and successfully assist shrinkwapped chicks. So try to avoid this. The more ventilation, the more moisutre needed IMO. Check the size of the air cell to verify moisture levels. http://www.poultryconnection.com/quackers/aircell.html The dehumidifier is in a 1000 sf room and 20 feet away from the incubator. I could move one of them if that would be better. When the weather starts to change I will not need it, but it is still very much summer here!Try to have the room the same temp and humidity throught the entire incubating perios. THis is easier because you don't have to keep adjusting your incubator to account for changes.
     
  9. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    Great job building the cabinet style with a rotisserie turner! Ingenious!

    One thing that gets over looked it the oxygen needds of the eggs; as they approach lockdown they need more air, so ventilation becomes more important as the egg develops. And during lockdownl These babies need to be able to breath.


    I had started with a 40w bulb but also found the bigger bigger bulb, for me 60w , worked better increating a faster cycling system. Gave very low range of temps. Thank goodness for anotebook while testing. Moving the wht around made me bonkers![​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  10. DMRippy

    DMRippy Pallet Queen Premium Member

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    Made some changes lowered the WHT temp and it was cycling between 99-99.9 so that is good right? If I add vent holes at the top will that change my temps much? I can up the WHT if I need to. Is 25% TOO LOW of a humidity for dry incubation? Adding water inside is not a problem. I do need to add holes to add water without opening it.

    I got eggs coming in a few days. Finally I will see if it really works!

    Thanks for the encouragement and advice!!!! Keep it coming!
     

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