The back of my rooster's comb is turning blackish grey and there is white hard stuff inside the comb

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Luckybaby, Feb 20, 2015.

  1. Luckybaby

    Luckybaby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 11, 2014
    My 10 month old rooster's comb started turning blackish grey few months ago. I checked it few months ago, and I didn't see anything unusual and I thought it was normal for it to happen, and it will go away on it's own. It is definitely not frostbite, since I live in Hawaii, and the temperature range is usually 65-85 degress fahrenheit. He is on the top of the pecking order since few months ago, but before December last year, my other rooster's and hen's peck at his comb a lot. The white hard stuff inside the comb is surrounded by the blackish grey comb and it is close to the middle of the area where the blackish grey comb is located. He seems healthy and very active.
     
  2. chickengr

    chickengr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 29, 2014
    greece
    something similar happened to my cockerel. I put some zinc vitamins cream which I use for my dogs (to heal wounds) - didn't have anything else and it is getting better now. I guess any cream for healing wounds would do. as I am a new chicken keeper, I do hope you will get the answer from more experienced people. good luck.
     
  3. Luckybaby

    Luckybaby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 11, 2014
    Should I try to take it out? It will heal fast if I take it out, since it is in the comb.
     
  4. Nupe

    Nupe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2014
    Georgia
    Sounds like a fungal infection. Pictures would help better determine that. If it is, you'll need to treat it with an anti-fungal cream. Pretty much any topical cream for athlete's foot, jock itch or yeast infection will work. Lotrimin is a popular name brand but there's plenty of cheaper generic versions. Unless he's getting picked on or needs to be encouraged to eat/drink, separation probably isn't necessary.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2015

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