The Best breed for egglaying

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Capvin, Oct 16, 2011.

  1. Capvin

    Capvin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is our first time having chickens and we wanted them strictly for eggs. We got 6 red sex links at one day old and they are now 29 weeks old. They began to lay at about 19 weeks and now lay a minimum of 5 eggs per day and most times six eggs per day and they average about 39 eggs per week week in and week out. Their eggs are consistently hard shelled and the size is from large to jumbo and they all lay their eggs in their nests and usually they are done laying by 9 in the morning. Being this is our first time it is hard for me to imagine any breed being a better and more consistent layer, or did we just get lucky. What other breeds have you found to be really good layers.
     
  2. Barred Babies

    Barred Babies Red Roof Farms

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    Any of your sex link breeds, that's what they were bred for. The only problem is, is that they go go go and putter out way before Heritage breeds will. So, if you want strictly for eggs and want them to lay like they choose any of them or your hatchery breeds.
     
  3. Capvin

    Capvin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks Missi...I just looked at your web site and it was interesting. Since we are in Central Florida I guess the weather would be similar to Louisiana and the chickens you show on your site would be good in my area also. When you refer to Heritage breeds, what are you specifically referring to...and when you say the red sex link production goes down early, at what age do they begin to not lay as well?? Thanks
     
  4. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Don't believe I'd keep a flock without at least some of these highly productive birds.

    The red sex links and/or production reds were designed especially for the world wide commercial egg industry, so your results are typical. If your goal is egg production, you'll need to think about a consistent plan of swapping your flock every 18 months. That's about what folks in the industry do, if they don't force a molt and keep them another production year.

    My advice is this, for what it is worth. Consider getting some chicks (4-6) each and every early summer. Each autumn, you have to cull your older birds. Or, alternate between getting spring chicks one year and later summer/early fall chicks the next summer. This is a way of effectively turning your flock over 16 months. You'll need a plan on what you will do with the birds you cull.

    It isn't that a commercial red hen cannot lay for 5 years, but they simply will not keep that pace up forever. Frankly, no breed does. All them show some drop over time.
     
  5. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    The white leghorns are another super producer. Chickens have been bred to fit many different situations. THe high production birds were designed for heavy egg laying in a controled environment with the best formulated feed and water always available. This is the most economical way to produce eggs commercially. THe spent chickens are also used.

    I have black sexlinks and planning to buy White Leghorns. My Easter Egger hen gives one jumbo egg a day every day, until fall when she slows down. I also have other breeds that do not produce as well but the eggs sure are pretty! And the chickens too!
     
  6. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Any Sex Link, Production Red, Leghorn, Hatchery Barred Rock, Ideal made a strain called Production Black and others will produce every day for 6 to 9 days straight and continue right through winter. Amazing birds that had me over run with eggs as underestimated them that a family of 6 couldn't keep with 6 birds.

    Now we know we never have to buy eggs and can house 6 chickens so are moving on to heritage and a rooster, yeah, I got suckered in and loving it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2011
  7. Capvin

    Capvin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Fred's Hens...your advise is good, except that I have a problem. We look upon our chickens as really loved pets and there is no way that we could give them up, much less kill them off to make room for younger hens. Other then eventually being overrun by hens I guess I could wait until they naturally die off, but I expect that could be more then 6 years.
     
  8. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Quote:OK, that is added information not included in your original post, which emphasized egg laying. I understand better now.

    If you wish long term pets, the better options are indeed more classic heritage styled birds. You won't get the uber fast production up front, but over time, you get fair to decent egg production.
     
  9. MommyMagpie

    MommyMagpie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Agree with Fred's Hens....we have two RSL hens that are about 18 months old, one is no longer laying at all and the other only lays 2 - 3 eggs a week. We have decided to always have two in our flock because their personalities are so great, but the rest of them will be dual purpose birds that won't have to be culled every other year. (As for the Cochins mentioned in my signature, I was suckered into buying those by DS14....we will keep one or two and hope to sell/give away the others, as soon as their tail feathers grow back)
     
  10. Barred Babies

    Barred Babies Red Roof Farms

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    Fred's Hens :

    Quote:OK, that is added information not included in your original post, which emphasized egg laying. I understand better now.

    If you wish long term pets, the better options are indeed more classic heritage styled birds. You won't get the uber fast production up front, but over time, you get fair to decent egg production.

    This is basically what I was trying to say. But my chickens aren't beloved pets that I wouldn't cull. I like my chickens, take very good care of them but when the time comes I will either sell them or cull them as needed!! There livestock.

    My simple understanding of Hertiage breeds are stock that has been bred true. They don't have little bits of this and that mixed in to try to get that characterization bred into them!! Might not be right but that's how I think about it!!​
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2011

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