the BEST guard dog breed!

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Howlet, Sep 5, 2014.

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  1. Howlet

    Howlet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Now people wanna know what dog breed is the absolute safest guard dog breed for chickens, right?? i can tell you now its NOT pyraneese, cattle dog, german shepherd or lab! It came down to Corgi's and Min.Pins!!!

    Now your prob. thinking "Mk *** IS DIS GUY TALKING BOUT. that tiny a** dog wont do sh**!"

    The thing is though, thats why there perfect! When there young puppies its less stressful for everyone to the fact how small they truly are. and there so tiny even as adaults they cant do much damage IF they decided to go comando x3

    Now Corgi's are from britian ( i think XD ) and were used there to herd cattle and guard them. this is beneficial to you because they will keep your hens decently close together and prevent anyone from running off where its not safe!

    Now onto a lovely favorite! MIN PINS!!! These are favorited for there awesome guarding instinct and have 1-0 prey drive! there known for there loud barks, which in a pair could easily scare off a raccoon.

    the perfect thing about both of them is they can be kept in a city lot- yard or a 90 acre farm!!

    Now dont go commenting a bunch of stuff like your wrong blah blah blah blah blah NUR, im not. im my perspective and im sure many others these will allways be a nice addition/ choice to add to your flock/family x3
     
  2. duchess

    duchess Out Of The Brooder

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    Both of these breeds are too small to be effective guardians. If a raccoon or fox decided they wanted your birds, they are not going to be deterred by just barking from a few small dogs. And coyotes would probably carry off your dog and then come back for your chickens. Plus both of these dogs have a high prey drive, and chickens flapping, squawking and running around is likely to set that off. If your dogs work for you, thats great. But neither are LGDs and they can't be expected to perform on a "90 acre farm." That is dangerous for the birds and the dogs.
     
  3. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    An adult pair of Corgis would have no trouble deterring one fox from attacking chickens. However, both coyotes and foxes will tag-team guard dogs. One coyote (or fox) will present himself to the dogs. While the dogs chase him away, the second coyote (or fox) will grab a chicken and run with it.

    I would not consider a Corgi a small dog.
     
  4. Suzie

    Suzie Overrun With Chickens

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    Any breed of dog needs intensive training...it does not just depend upon the breed...

    Any dog can suddenly become unpredictable given certain circumstances...I have been training GSD's for many years and some are excellent guardians..others can be as predatory as any other threatening outsiders...

    I currently have five GSD's and would not exchange them for any other breed...they are wonderful herders and protect my flocks from any potential predator attack...all are trained to a high degree....and their training is ongoing as circumstances change...they have their duty to herd, guard and protect...it is purely a matter of choice and reward for what we put in we will eventually get out of our dogs...

    Good luck with yours...
     
  5. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    For birds already inside poultry netting, the Corgi might be suitable as a raptor deterrent. In my setting against a fox, the most difficult predator to deal with, they would be no better or worse than a Great Pyrenees. You just need more than one dog, lots of speed, locations flock can seek to increase capture time for predator, and smarts in the dog to take advantage of the previous. My coyotes would likely not stand up to a Corgi in part because not worth it but they also do not have the gall to hunt under a similar sized or better dog's nose like a red fox does.
     
  6. Howlet

    Howlet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    well i didnt mean have them runnning 90 acres, i meant just the chicken area. and a min pin has almost 0 prey drive....
     
  7. Howlet

    Howlet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    mk and MAYBE i worded this a bit wrong. scratch the whole 90 acres thing. i was talking about the suburbs more i guess in my mind. considering chances of a fox or coyote appearing in a suburb are less den a coon...?
     
  8. Howlet

    Howlet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    u realize they use corgis to guard cow herds right?
     
  9. duchess

    duchess Out Of The Brooder

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    They don't guard cows, they herd cows. With shepherds there with them. Not alone in a field against predators. I have border collies and they are wonderful herding and watch dogs, but they are NOT guard dogs. Watch dogs alert, guard dogs protect. Big difference. I have nothing against corgis, they are wonderful little dogs (and yes, they are relatively small in the dog world), but they are bred for a purpose and that purpose is not to be a livestock guard dog. Thats great that your foxes wont go after your corgi, maybe my foxes are more aggressive, but I've doctored my 40lb herding dog after a scrap with a single fox, and I doubt a 25lb corgi would have been ok and I think it is naive to think they would be safe against larger predators, and that coyotes don't go into suburbs. Google coyote attacks dog suburbs and see how many hits you get. Again, I think its great that small dogs work in your situation, but its irresponsible to advocate for them as guard dogs. Its a disservice to the dogs.

    ETA:
    I'm sorry, but a working great pyrenees (working, not pet) has hundreds of years of instinct for protection. One GP would decimate a fox long before the corgis managed to scare it off
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2014
  10. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    I am not fly by night when it comes to this and have studied dogs a lot lately and know to scrutinize what is written in breed descriptions or touted by dog breeders / peddlers. To decimate a fox you must first catch it.


    I am very, very familliar with the strengths and limitations of Great Pyrenees and LGD's in general. They are bred to protect large tightly organized and moblie herds against predators that must consume a sheep or goat more or less on the spot. Such predators generally most control carcass and the LGD's deny not only that but also easy access to herd. Predators that do make such efforts are larger and much less maneuverable than a fox. Chickens, which are the "herd" here do not behave the same and can be packed off easily even by a fox. Once in a while the LGD will get lucky and catch a fox overly focused on chicken being chased or corner one against pen or building but generally the LGD's especially the Great Pyrenees are too slow to give a good chase. You must keep discussion where chickens are the concern, not what the dogs where bred for.
     
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