The City, Are They Ever Going To Be Satisfied?

Discussion in 'Local Chicken Laws & Ordinances (and how to change' started by California Gurl, Dec 1, 2011.

  1. California Gurl

    California Gurl Out Of The Brooder

    51
    0
    29
    Jun 27, 2011
    One of my neighbor called the city about us a couple months ago. The first time they said I had to get rid of some of the chickens and just clean up a bit. So I did I sold bout 30 chickens and chicks, plus I cleaned up the backyard and also put out those smelly fly trap. The second visit they said I have too many again and need to sell more and that I'm not allowed to free-range them. Sold about 20 this time around and only allow them out for a few hours everyday when weather permit. I putted up more fly trap installed sand in their run w/ pine shaving and DE added to it. Here I'm thinking that it should be fine right. Well the most recent time they stopped by they said we have too many again and half to get rid of half of them and do more against the fly population.

    Our lay and ordinance state that they must be 20 feet away from dwelling and no roosters. It never state how many we can have.

    Our neighbor never said anything about it to us. We never had any problem before.
    I should called the cops when I caught one of them in a backyard trying to pick some of our fruit without asking.

    Found out through a second party that our neighbor said that they don't like smelling the "farm smell' every time they BBQ and at night when they go to sleep.

    I am sick and tired of dealing with this sh*t....[​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2011
  2. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

    21,917
    73
    418
    Jan 12, 2007
    Land of Lincoln
    If you had total of 50 chickens sold and probably have 20, I can see why they would complain. Once the odor is out, and getting complaints, then you really need to cut back to a reasonable number of chickens you easily care for and be able to clean up after them.
     
  3. California Gurl

    California Gurl Out Of The Brooder

    51
    0
    29
    Jun 27, 2011
    Quote:I do admit it has gotten out of control and I have taken steps to take care of it to fix it. Like selling them, doing something about the smell, cleaing up more, and what not but it seems like the city would rather have me get rid of them all together.
     
  4. suntex01

    suntex01 Out Of The Brooder

    46
    1
    24
    Nov 12, 2011
    Quote:I do admit it has gotten out of control and I have taken steps to take care of it to fix it. Like selling them, doing something about the smell, cleaing up more, and what not but it seems like the city would rather have me get rid of them all together.

    The problem is, you let it get out of control in the first place. So now, they're on to you. You're on their radar now. So probably best to lay low for while before you start back up.
    I have to say, having 50+ in your backyard might have gone a little too far even if they're bantams, unless you have a really large lot and I mean really large. I have 1/3 acre lot and I can't imagine having more than 20 chickens without neighbors noticing...
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2011
  5. kari_dawn

    kari_dawn Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,372
    28
    198
    Nov 2, 2009
    North Texas
    so, since you sold 50, and the city still wants you to decrease numbers, how many do you have left? How much space do you have? How close are your neighbors? Have you tried mixing lyme into the soil to help cut down the smell? Or maybe sweet PDZ?

    What the others are saying about you now being on the City's radar are absolutely correct. When we get a citizen constantly calling in on a specific location, we pay attention. Most of the time, the complaint is unfounded (I have been getting the same complaint call on a horse that is not being provided water or food [even though the horse for weeks, even though she has ample grass, hay, and fresh water, and is in good body condition...many people keep their horses on pasture, and you certainly don't keep grain out 24/7 for a horse] point is, we have to use our best judgement in the field), but when it's founded, it MUST be fixed. Ask your inspector how many they would see as an acceptable number for you to keep.

    We do not have laws pertaining to hens in the city I work for, but we do have sanitation ordinances. I have used those in the past to get people to decrease abhorant numbers of livestock on small lots. Honestly, if my citizens are cooperating with me and showing me progress when I come and inspect, I am happy. My co-workers feel the same way. Many people see us as just dog catchers and do not realize the complexity of our jobs, and knowledge (and certification) required to do the work we do. When we do have a citizen work with us, we generally work with them in return. The exact same is true for those who don't cooperate. If I have to call the cops on you, you better believe you are getting more than just a citation or two.

    Im sorry that you are having to go through this, but the squeaky wheel gets the oil, and someone is really upset with how your animal keeping is affecting them. Chances are, they are continuing to call in. How many birds do you have, and on how much space?

    Right now, I have twenty pullets and juvies, and I have 3/4 of an acre...having that many is driving me batty!
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2011
  6. BrattishTaz

    BrattishTaz Roo Magnet

    4,445
    17
    213
    Jan 8, 2011
    Tampa Area, Florida
    I can certainly see neighbors having an issue with more than 70 birds if the lots are typical (smaller) city sized lots. Even a very well maintained coop would have a strong odor with that many chickens. I know when I lived in the city, the smell of my neighbor's dogs drove me nuts. Their dogs were well cared for but the houses were just too close together. The stench would get so bad in the summer that we could not enjoy our yard. [​IMG]

    I would suggest you limit your number of chickens and keep their area extra clean now. The city could decide to outlaw chickens all together if they start receiving complaints. You are fortunate they allow them at all. Many BYCers are having to hide their birds or are fighting to change the laws forbidding them. One bad situation could be harmful for all chicken keepers.
     
  7. zzGypsy

    zzGypsy Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,981
    22
    141
    Aug 8, 2011
    yes to what's been said above.

    on the radar = a bad thing.

    you might try and ask the inspector what they believe an appropriate number is, as well as what other measures you need to take. specifically. so you can be sure to get it right. they may just be jerking you through knotholes right now, but if you get a commitment from them on specifically what you have to do you might be able to get to a point where they stop bothering you.

    for other things you can do, you might look into fly wasps. we use them for fly control and have had good success, although nothing works like proper manure management. order MANY more than you think you need if you've already got a problem with flies... the websites that sell them give you a guideline on how many to order and you can call them about how many to get for an established problem. they're tiny, about the size of tiny black ants and are only interested in fly larva, so you don't need to worry the neighbors will have an issue or discover them. depending on where you are, it may be too cold to start with them, but generally, if you've got flys flying, you can use fly wasps.
     
  8. Skiptonius

    Skiptonius Out Of The Brooder

    11
    0
    24
    Nov 29, 2011
    I am so glad I am reading all these posts, even though I don't even have any chickens! I am learning so much and I will be very prepared when the time comes for me to have my own flock. I had no idea about fly wasps, which seems like a great idea to control the flies. Although chickens are allowed in the city where I live, we are going to be moving outside the city limits to a township. I really need to start my homework and make sure I follow any ordinances that are in place. Perhaps we should introduce ourselves to our new neighbors and let them in on our plans for a coop, instead of building it and waiting for them to complain and having to take it down... Lots to think about, thanks to all for the information!
     
  9. flgardengirl

    flgardengirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    4,427
    63
    246
    Dec 2, 2009
    Sunny side up :)
    I would type up and print out a list of all the 'improvements' you have made and also the cost, and date the improvements were made, your name and address of course etc. Hand it to them the next time they come over. That way they have something to refer to that shows you are cooperating with them. It also gives you some proof that you have been cooperating in case you decide to obtain legal council. I would also print out a copy of the code showing that there is no limit on fowl but state that you voluntarily downsized your flock in order to cooperate with them.
    If you don't have any more code violations then they have no business harrassing you. I would also take some photos of my property or a video with a date stamp and maybe take some video next time they come to the property and make sure everything is documented from here on out.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2011
  10. kari_dawn

    kari_dawn Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,372
    28
    198
    Nov 2, 2009
    North Texas
    Quote:it sounds like a hastle, but when the city has you in their sights, this is a REALLY good idea. When we have citizens who are repeatedly reported on, some of them go so far as to post their vet records, vaccination status, and city registration status on their front door. That way, when we get called out, we can see the paperwork without ever disturbing the citizen. Records records records! If it isn't on paper, it didnt happen.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by