The Conundrum of Selling Meat Birds

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by halimak1, Oct 28, 2016.

  1. halimak1

    halimak1 Out Of The Brooder

    35
    2
    21
    Sep 18, 2016
    North Alabama
    I'm 6 weeks into growing 20+ pasture raised broiler chickens (soy free, corn free, non GMO if that matters) and I am only going to keep a few for the next generation. So my questions are
    1) is it feasible to raise a next generation on a small scale or should I just get more chicks from the hatchery
    2) I know I have to sell the birds live and process as a service, so do I sell by hang weight or processed weight? (I plan on packing with the bird the important innards and feet for stock)

    Oh and I plan on growing them until 10 weeks...

    Thanks for any advice!
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2016
  2. Hay Belly

    Hay Belly Chillin' With My Peeps

    52
    2
    84
    Feb 7, 2010
    You are asking others to make a business plan for you after you have started a business.
     
  3. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

    29,699
    17,988
    666
    Jan 30, 2015
    Africa - near the equator
    My suggestions, as per question
    1. Get more chicks from a hatchery - that way you are assured of growth rates and the cost of keeping a breeding flock will outweigh the cost of getting chicks (plus breeding stock require different feeding regimes from an early age - limited food rations etc).

    2. Since most commercial outlets for meat sell by the dressed weight, I'd do that.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. halimak1

    halimak1 Out Of The Brooder

    35
    2
    21
    Sep 18, 2016
    North Alabama

    Sorry if it sounds like that. I have no business. I'm doing it for myself and my family. I just don't know what is the social norm for the extras that my family and friends won't eat.
     
  5. halimak1

    halimak1 Out Of The Brooder

    35
    2
    21
    Sep 18, 2016
    North Alabama

    Thank you for your honest advice. I am just starting this whole small scale farming bit and am flying by the seat of my pants with most things!
     
  6. SIMZ

    SIMZ Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,107
    144
    231
    Apr 29, 2011
    Northwest Indiana
    My experience is with Cornish Cross and I definitely suggest just buying chicks each time. You can either sell them at a "per bird" price (processed, of course) or by the pound. I've seen it either way and have sold both ways.

    What kind are you raising? We process Cornish Cross around 6-8 weeks and they're usually between 4-6 lbs. at that point. Their growth drops off after that but they continue to eat as much.

    Best of luck!
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. halimak1

    halimak1 Out Of The Brooder

    35
    2
    21
    Sep 18, 2016
    North Alabama

    They are Rolin S which is a cross between the red color heritage breeds and the Cornish Cross, processing at 10 weeks.. I don't know much about chickens so please excuse me if I didn't get terms correct. They're supposed to have a slower growth rate, getting plenty to eat off of the land right now, too. :D after this round I'll surely learn a little more, and what's life without a little unknown adventure, right?!
     
  8. SIMZ

    SIMZ Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,107
    144
    231
    Apr 29, 2011
    Northwest Indiana
    Absolutely! [​IMG]
     
  9. eviemethugh

    eviemethugh Chillin' With My Peeps

    280
    53
    98
    May 14, 2015
    North Carolina
    I'm just a little confused. Alabama allows processing under the federal exemption for growers up to 1000 or 20000 birds on farm. So why can't you sell by processed weight? Calling the processing a service doesn't matter under PPIA.

    For the extras, I would bag them separately and not charge people for them, if they want them they can have them as a "lagniappe" as they say in lower alabama. (A little something extra for free!) So charge a fair price for yourself, without needing the extra ounces from the bits to make your money back.



    All that to say: I think you can sell them at processed weight
     
  10. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

    31,452
    3,536
    538
    Jun 18, 2010
    Southern Oregon

    That's what I was thinking also, just not positive on that particular state.

    I'd say process them, bag them (here in Oregon we just can't cut them up, they have to be whole) and weigh them. Decide on your price per pound, and there ya go.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by