The coop in fall and winter..

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by sramelyk, Oct 5, 2012.

  1. sramelyk

    sramelyk Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 16, 2012
    Borden, IN
    Sorry if this question has been answered before.

    Its starting to get a little more chilly were I live and the nights are sometimes getting down in to the low forties and upper thirties. For the first time I'm having to consider what to do in the winter months and the next few. I have 1 hen and 1 rooster right now and they spend the night in a nice enclosed coop all night. By enclosed I mean on all sides with corrugated roof. Do I need to provide them heat with a heat light? When or at what temperatures do I need to start doing if that's the case. For some reason I was thinking they would be fine without it but now am getting worried for winter.

    Any advice is greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!
     
  2. mickey328

    mickey328 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They should be fine to below zero as long as they're draft free, still have good ventilation and have some nice litter for snuggling in, unless they're breeds that are not cold hardy :)
     
  3. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Overrun With Chickens

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    X2 - the keys being draft-free and well-ventilated.
     
  4. NovaAman

    NovaAman Overrun With Chickens

    No heat lamp unless you can guarantee that it will never ever go out.

    No really, no heat lamp. Good ventilation is a must so moisture does not build up. 2x4 roosts, so they can sit on their feet, and no drafts. If you are planning to keep them cooped all winter, meaning no out door time, or do not have a roofed and enclosed run, be sure they have enough space. AND by all means get that rooster some more hens in the spring, or sooner or your lone hen is going to be seriously over mated. Not good.

    I am in Michigan, right on LK. MI, and I do not heat. Moisture and drafts will be your biggest enemy. Use deep litter in the coop also and a heated water dish.
     
  5. sramelyk

    sramelyk Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 16, 2012
    Borden, IN
    That brings me to another question.. They free range now during the day. I'd assume they can still do that in the winter with snow on the ground?

    Well, I started with what I thought was 6 hens. 4 of them were eaten by predators until I got a proper run worked out. At which time I discovered 1 of the 2 left was a rooster. Around here I can't get chicks after springs so it was to late. I tried to get the one hen broody and I was going to hatch a few but she had zero interest. As soon as she lays an egg she's outta there!

    Thanks! Glad to know I don't have to worry about heating. I don't think drafts or ventilation will be a problem.
     
  6. mickey328

    mickey328 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    As long as the snow's not too deep, they'll likely be happy to wander around, but there won't be much forage at that time. It'll give them something to do though :) If you get more than an inch or so, try to scrape some off...that way they don't have to actually wade through it.
     
  7. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Overrun With Chickens

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    My hens pretty much stick to the areas I shovel for them :)rolleyes: I know...), but we get a lot of snow.
     

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