The incredible, edible egg?

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by Mahonri, Dec 27, 2008.

  1. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    North Phoenix
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    Last edited: Dec 27, 2008
  2. Jena

    Jena The Welsh Witch

    Nov 2, 2008
    Cardiff
    Hmmm so do I.

    The real problem is that people have become increasingly sedentary and they don't earn their food. No exercise, plus they are now so hooked on processed foods which are high in all the bad things, that is what increases the risks.

    these institutions are hooked also on the funding to pump up the scare factors, and draw in the big dollars for research that has massive holes in it as far as methodology is concerned.

    If we take what they say seriously then we are forced more and more towards the tailored processed foods, and thinking then that it is ok to sit around all day, do nothing.

    Moderation is the key word here, and food that tastes good satisfies you far more than the cardboard they serve us. If we are satisfied with food then we will get up take the benefit of the nutrients and grow some more... and enjoy our eggs.

    Lol.... here's to a health year.

    Jena.
     
  3. Rosalind

    Rosalind Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 25, 2007
    The associations held independently of intake of red meat, fruits and vegetables, fish, and nuts. In this study these foods showed no association with heart failure risk likely because there were too few heart failure cases to detect the heart benefits previously linked with eating fish, fruit and vegetables, and nuts, Nettleton said.

    (bold added for emphasis) Wait, what?

    This sentence makes me think they did their statistics wrong, but I'm not about to drive all the way into work to get the original article off my work subscription and check their math. It seems like they started out intending to study cases of heart failure but didn't get nearly as many as they expected from their cohort, so instead they looked at all the secondary indicators and whomped together an article out of it.

    I am also assuming that in the long version of the publication (it's not in the abstract) that they have better quantitation of what is considered "excessive" eggs and dairy sufficient to bring about these results. Two eggs per day, five eggs per day, a dozen smothered in cheese and butter?

    Also would be interested to know whether they corrected for known familial cholesterol mutations; some people are genetically able to regulate their cholesterol better than others, it makes for odd quirks in the data set if you haven't corrected for it--APOB, PCSK9 R46L, etc.​
     
  4. Opa

    Opa Opa-wan Chickenobi

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    May 11, 2008
    Howell Michigan
  5. Jena

    Jena The Welsh Witch

    Nov 2, 2008
    Cardiff
    Rosalind you are so right,

    this article has absolutely no credibility without them making reference to these issues.

    I also query how they have stated that they have not included the issues of red meat, fruit, egetables.

    Haven't they been telling us for years that red meat causes heart failure, while white meat does not and is a better link with the super healthy fruits and vegetables? Just the way it is laid out looks toally confusing and lacking in detail.

    I did a historical study of an area from 1840 to 1860, and based on the information presented it looked as if "Toy Boys" were not a new thing, lol. In the majority of families the Male head of the family was up to 20 years younger than the woman.

    Based on limited info the case was proved, it was only when you looked at other figures that illustrated the high mortality rate of working in the Iron Industry and the custom of the next youngest single male member of a family stepping into a household to maintain it, following the death of the breadwinner that you could make sense of it.

    Reports like this should detail the methodology, and the limitations of the data provided, otherwise it is so confusing and misleading.

    Jena.
     
  6. English Chick

    English Chick English Mum

    Jun 27, 2008
    Cheshire UK
    WOOOOOOOT !!!!!!!!!!![​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    I for one am NOT going to listen to anymore jargon from these "studies"

    For example my DH who is 62 years very young, has eaten eggs (3) bacon, tomatoes mushrooms etc, along with a first serving of cereals, then toast and marmalade all of our married life (25 years) he drinks whole fresh full fat milk straight from the milk tank .....(a pint per day as he is milking)..he is the healthiest man I have ever come across....his cholestrol is far far lower than mine..I have to take meds to keep me on target (and I have always eaten healthy!) my is genetic..his is not......Eat what you like..in moderation....plants and animals where put on this planet for a reason.....and eggs are good for you...and fresh free range eggs have less cholestrol, than shop bought eggs...and I'm no scientist.....and that came from a study done a long time ago.....

    Don't be afraid to eat........( he also loves all red meat.......)
     
  7. kinnip

    kinnip Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 24, 2008
    Carrollton, GA
    High cholesterol runs in my family. We have run the gamut of cholesterol lowering diets, from my youth to adulthood. They helped little to lower cholesterol, because dietary cholesterol has little effect on serum cholesterol. I'm the only one of those of us affected who eats eggs almost daily-- yolk and all. I also have the lowest and steadiest cholesterol values. Eggs have the vitamin E and B vitamins your body needs to make good use of cholesterol. This is particularly important because much of your body is made from cholesterol, especially the really good parts like your nervous system.
    This brings me to one other rant-- I think statins suck. Liver damage aside, cholesterol is too big to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Your brain has to produce its own cholesterol in order to function. Statins not only lower the amount of cholesterol produced by your liver, they reduce the cholesterol produced by your brain, which reduces the efficiency of neural transmissions. I'd rather eat a slew of eggs and veg, and get a lot of exercise.
     
  8. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    Mahonri, WE are the good press for eggs! Every single one of us who raises his or her own chickens, distributes eggs, and discusses this great hobby with others is a walking press kit to the community. [​IMG] That said, I am always disappointed in media stories like this ~ they are so sloppy about reporting research.

    Anyone who has been trained in research knows you should be reporting only the facts, and you should be completely open with your method and your sample group information. As somewhat of a research geek, I know well that you can make the stats imply anything you want by how you report them, so you must be very careful.

    Thanks, Opa, for the Harvard article. Like your new avatar! That way I'll know you if I see you on the street somewhere.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2008
  9. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    Quote:I am with you my friend.
     
  10. English Chick

    English Chick English Mum

    Jun 27, 2008
    Cheshire UK
    I know what your saying Kinnip re statins and agree wholeheartedly with you, but with most members of my family dying very young through heart disease and diabetes.....and my cholestrol shooting through the roof, the Dr said i had no choice but to use stains...I hate them as they really really do affect the brain particularly short term memory....but you have got me thinking even more and I will look into them further...I would also love to come off all my meds totally!........am going to see how I get on when I quit smoking...and hopefully have a life without meds and cigs.....
     

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