The price of Capons!

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by marty8587, Oct 27, 2011.

  1. marty8587

    marty8587 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have an older Brother that is coming for Thanksgiving and is alergic to turkey. The plan was to buy a capon and cook it stuffed like a turkey as he doen't usually get that, but I priced one at Food For Less and it was $3.98 per lb., a $35.00 bird.... What makes them so expensive?
     
  2. sonew123

    sonew123 Poultry Snuggie

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    Quote:..I just did a little research and they said the capons are usually between 7-10 lbs each and more flavorful. For some reason, in my head [​IMG] , I thought they were 2-3 lbs...You have to rememeber too these birds had surgery on them to be castrated-to allow them to grow longer without all the male hormone drama. So that expense is added into their per pound weight too.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2011
  3. domino7

    domino7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Capons usually range from 8 to 10 pounds. They take 16 weeks to get to market weight, versus 5 to 8 weeks for the modern meat chickens. That's why they cost so much more. Years ago, they were easy to find in the stores, especially before the holidays, but have become fairly rare now.
     
  4. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

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    Just a regular old chicken nicely stuffed and roasted crispy brown should make him happy.

    There's also duck, if he likes it, and goose. Although you ain't seen nothing yet if you think a capon is expensive to purchase for your holiday dinner. A roasting goose requires a new mortgage on your house.

    There is probably still time to find a local who is raising Cornish Cross who will agree to keep a Cornish Cross for an extra 2 weeks for you before butchering. That will give you a huge chicken. Although, free range chicken is often $4 a pound.
     
  5. marty8587

    marty8587 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'll hold off and see whats available closer to Thanksgiving. The Fred Meyer store had roasting chickens a few years back at about 7lbs. each, but I hate to dig up a coffee can of money just to buy a chicken!
     
  6. FarmrGirl

    FarmrGirl MooseMistress

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    Quote:2x I sell my Cornish Cross for $3.50/lb and the cockerels dress out at 5lbs in 8 weeks... I have a strict 8 week policy tho. I may harvest some smaller birds for customers at 6 weeks but I won't go over 8 weeks because it's just too uncomfortable for the chicken.
     
  7. mstricer

    mstricer Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:Just a question, if he is allergic to turkey, wouldn't it be all poultry? Just a thought.
    Michele
     
  8. jcatblum

    jcatblum Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Just a question, if he is allergic to turkey, wouldn't it be all poultry? Just a thought.
    Michele

    Nope-- have a friend alergic to chicken but can eat Turkey. It is complicated, I googled & tried to understand it once.
     
  9. marty8587

    marty8587 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just Turkey, it's wierd, but he gets pretty sick.
     
  10. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

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    People who are allergic to chicken eggs can often eat duck eggs. Weird. You'd think an egg is an egg, but apparently, that's not so.

    Turkeys and chickens are different animals.
     

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