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The Rough Draft for a New Coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by RowdyNo, Dec 4, 2013.

  1. RowdyNo

    RowdyNo Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 28, 2013
    Cheney WA
    I figured that I could post this and see if there is anyone who could give some tips/advice about the layout of my new coop BEFORE I go and build it. [​IMG]

    So what do you think? (It's 10'x10', split down the middle at the 5' mark. 1cm = 1')

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2013
  2. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    I would swing your door out instead of in to avoid litter and frozen bedding impeding the opening in the winter time.
    I would cut your pop door about 1ft off the floor to allow for bedding and the like. I cut mine about 8" inches from the floor and I wish I had went 12" (my coop foot print is only 4x8). I would put my nest boxes about 24 inches off the floor in order to utilize space beneath (excellent place for feeders and waters). I have my roost and poop boards above the nest boxes.

    POOP BOARDS are the "BEST" addition yet. Handles well over ½ of the poop in my set up keeps ammonia smell in check 3½" below roost excellent for catching eggs laid through the night (roost are in cups for easier removal and cleaning). I recently friction fit a piece of vinyl flooring over my poop board.it makes clean up even easier; Pop out; Scrap; Hose; Pop in.

    Nest boxes
    In my nest boxes I fold a feed bag to fit (nest boxes are 1 ft³). When a bag gets soiled; fold a new one; pop out the soiled; pop in the new.

    Easy peasy!.


    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2013
    2 people like this.
  3. RowdyNo

    RowdyNo Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 28, 2013
    Cheney WA
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2013
  4. RowdyNo

    RowdyNo Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 28, 2013
    Cheney WA
    Quote: BRILLIANT!!! See, this is exactly why I posted! Little things like this! :D

    Question: If I'm doing a sand/gravel litter, would I still want to have their exit elevated so much?

    Also, poop boards are a MUST! I'm planning on putting chicken wire under the roosting bars to keep the birds off the boards. Vinyl flooring is a super nice touch though!

    Thanks so much!!!
     
  5. RowdyNo

    RowdyNo Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 28, 2013
    Cheney WA
    Will this hold 20 or more birds?
     
  6. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    I know it is not recommended; I have housed 24 birds in my set up (4x8 metal coop) over the winter with no problems. They also rarely ventured outside the coop on those wintery snow covered days. That being said according to the 4 square foot per bird your coop 100 ft² could house 25 birds by most peoples standards and calculations.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  7. RowdyNo

    RowdyNo Out Of The Brooder

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    Cheney WA
    Yeah I was kinda hoping that the roosting area would count as more sq footage.
     
  8. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    I think it does in a perfect world according to my set up anyway.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Northwest Arkansas
    Work up your material list and then plan your cuts. Most building materials come in 4’ or 8’ dimensions. Eight foot lumber is cheaper than ten foot lumber. You should be able to build an 8x12 for less money, with fewer cuts, and less waste material to get rid of. An 8x16 may not be a whole lot more expensive or take any longer to build than a 10x10. Don’t forget your roof, though. It’s on a slant so its slightly longer plus you want enough overhang to have ventilation openings up there and still keep rain out.

    You might follow the link in my signature to get my opinion on how many birds you can fit in there. There is no magic number that fits all of us, we are all unique in our circumstances and management techniques.

    [​IMG]

    I like having removable roosts. Here’s how I attached mine. There are different ways to do all of these things. Just pick the way that you like.

    I’m a big believer in flexibility and simplicity. You sound like me, over-planning and overthinking everything. I find that when you put these plans into practice, they don’t always work out as planned. For example, if you put the pop door at ground level you have no flexibility without major revision if the sand/gravel doesn’t work out for you. If you raise it a foot, they can still use it just as well but you have designed in flexibility. If you are worried about baby chicks being able to get in or out, use a cinder block, pavers, bricks, or build something as steps.

    I think you will find that chicken wire under the roosts to be a royal pain and it won’t really gain you anything. It won’t hurt them to step on that droppings board, if they do much at all.
     
    2 people like this.
  10. RowdyNo

    RowdyNo Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 28, 2013
    Cheney WA
    Fewer cuts was not something I had thought of. That's a good point, I'll play with the plans again and see what I can come up with.

    I've been rethinking the chicken wire under the roosts, thanks for laying that to rest for me. :)

    I honestly hadn't given it as far as if the floor doesn't work, and making steps or something of the like would be really easy.

    Thanks for the input!!!
     

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