Therapy duck training!

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Virus, Sep 18, 2015.

  1. Virus

    Virus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So I've decided to start training my mallard drake Odette to be a therapy animal. I feel that ducks could make amazing therapy animals as they're intelligence is close to that of a dog and they are very affectionate animals. Odette is a little over 5 months old now and he's be handled and taught commands since the day he was born so I feel his up to the task. I'm currently researching the requirements of therapy animals which is difficult considering all I find is for dogs so its going to take a little while to figure out what he needs to learn but I have started teaching him to walk on a leash. I was wondering if any one has any tips for training him to like stay when told or tips on leash training. I'll update on his progress as its made. Thank you for reading!
     
  2. JadeComputerGal

    JadeComputerGal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You might want to try reading and asking for advice on this thread-->https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/632070/show-off-your-house-ducks. Even if he's not a house duck, the things you're trying to accomplish are things many house duck owners have been through.
     
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  3. Amykins

    Amykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Uhhh...heh. Well, not...not really. A dog of average intelligence will ALWAYS be smarter than even the smartest duck. But you're right about them being affectionate! I've been trying to train mine to be therapy birds for a while now, but I gotta tell ya, it's just not working out. Drakes already have a bit of a chip on their shoulder and are highly territorial, so they'll chase and bite anyone who they deem as a threat. I've tried to train this out of Wobbles since the day he came of age, but it's just not sticking.

    I've also been trying to teach both Wobbles and Bean basic commands, and although I've made a little progress, it's nothing I would consider substantial. Bean is fine, but when she gets scared, she'll bite. And then there's the biggest hurdle of all: Ducks HATE change. New environments tend to scare them. So any time you introduce them to a new person or a new place (which will experience very frequently as therapy animals), they'll most likely forget any training they had and will behave not at all like they did with you in the comfort of their home turf.

    Basically what I'm saying is, if you succeed, lemme know because after 15 months of trying I have almost given up on my dream of having therapy ducks!
     
    gilbert2 likes this.
  4. Virus

    Virus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Odette was hatched by himself by me and he's never seen a duck, because of this he's very comfortable around humans since he thinks he us one (even ones he has never met). He goes new places all the time and after looking around for a minute he's totally fine. I'm planning to bring him to school with me as well so he keeps this behavior. Odette isn't really scared of anything besides my chicken Downey (not even children) he's only ever bit my toes and that is just playing. He also already knows to come when called which I actually thought was pretty easy to teach him. I'm going to work with him quite a bit so I'm sure he'll make some progress. Thanks for the feed back I appreciate it!
     
    gilbert2 likes this.
  5. Amykins

    Amykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Wobbles was the exact same way. Imprinted on me, hatched by me, all alone until we got Bean this past summer. He was totally fine until he hit puberty, and then everything was BITE BITE BITE all the time.

    Wobbles will come when called though. But only when I do it. Hehe. <3 And only when we're home! At the park he just goes "feh" and keeps on wandering off in search of tasty noms :p
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2015
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  6. Virus

    Virus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Is Wobbles a domestic breed because domestic male ducks have longer and stronger mating periods then mallards for pretty obvious reasons (farmers need more ducks so longer periods they want to make babies) A domestic ducks seaso lasts almost a whole year a mallards lasts a few months. During the time he's in season he won't be working any other time he's a big baby who likes to cuddle
     
  7. buff goose guy

    buff goose guy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mississippi Y'all
    no the bantam class of domestic ducks have a short period of breeding and laying its the larger breeds that famers raised to lay more and more. bantams breeds are usually for just their beauty.

    By handing raising your male duck he will see people as things to breed with and until he has a female he will continue to mate with you becuase he didnt learn that a female has seasons and if he is kept inside usually the outside temperature has little effect on there breeding since it stays one temperture uslly they dont shut down there hormones.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2015
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  8. Virus

    Virus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well that makes since as u said the bantams are decorative ducks so they wouldn't be breed that much unlike large breeds used for eggs and meat which others are. Mallards are wild ducks or if raised by humans usually decorative since they only lsy seasonally. In the wild they need to focus more on food then girls constantly
     
  9. buff goose guy

    buff goose guy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mississippi Y'all
    i know but thanks
     
  10. JadeComputerGal

    JadeComputerGal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Virus, Mallards are Bantams. All Mallards, domestic or wild ones. It is not legal in any state to keep a wild Mallard without a permit, and if you have a domestic Mallard, it's a domestic bantam duck/drake. Domestic ducks don't necessarily have a longer or shorter mating period. There are many factors involved in mating and laying with ducks, including the length of the day wherever the duck is located.
     
    gilbert2 likes this.

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