There a local exotic farm and I'm thinking of adopting a Liger

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by ChooksChick, Apr 1, 2012.

  1. ChooksChick

    ChooksChick BeakHouse's Mad Chicken Scientist

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    It seems they have too many cross bred animals and the farm I'm on will let me, so I was thinking a Liger (it's my favorite animal) and maybe something else for a friend.

    Anyone have experience?
     
  2. KatGold

    KatGold Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Chooks,

    I don't mean for this to sound snide, it isn't meant that way at all. I'm just asking out of pure, wide-eyed, curiosity and a quest for understanding.

    With all the reasons to not keep a wild animal, why would you even consider this?
     
  3. mstricer

    mstricer Overrun With Chickens

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    Renee,
    What does the liger look like as a cub, more like a lion Or a tiger. Would you have it declawed. I guess if you are breeding chickens, you can use your culled to feed it. How much land do you need to own one?
    Michele
     
  4. Wisher1000

    Wisher1000 Bama Biddy

    You can't have a liger declawed, they have talons, not claws and it is the source of all their wicked skills.......just sayin.......
     
  5. Spangled

    Spangled Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A friend of mine ... Dr. Napoleon ... has a few Ligers. He raises Tigons, also, which are his specialty. (Tiger/Lion crosses.) Some are infertile, but he's done a good job with them. He has a program in place with all sorts of protocols and standards. It's bouncing around in my head that he got a grant for his research. I seem to remember that he has had a number of his papers published. PM me and I'll put you in touch with him.

    Edited to add: Surprisingly, he has moved on and is no longer involved with big cats. He's moved on to other things.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2012
  6. ChooksChick

    ChooksChick BeakHouse's Mad Chicken Scientist

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    Sweet! If I can get 2, I'll mate them and then I can give you some of their tots!!
     
  7. Wisher1000

    Wisher1000 Bama Biddy

    Oh, yea, maybe it is the Tigon that has the talons............... it's been a long time since I saw the documentary on Dr. N's research............
     
  8. Spangled

    Spangled Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would love some of their tots. I'm not going to give them 1% milk, though. I think they'll be better off with 2% or 4%. The fine doctor and his girlfriend (now wife) were discussing the proper milkfat at one time while I was visiting them. I can't remember which milk is best. I guess it would probably be better to ship the tots after they are weaned, though, anyway. Alternatively, the bonding that occurs when the new owner feeds them from the bottle does have some benefits.


    For the life of me I don't remember them having talons. I know that my chickens have large talons. If the Tigons have large talons, then that will offer a good deal of protection. I would love to have a Tigon and name it "Pedro."
     
  9. philter4

    philter4 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can declaw a tiger, or any cat for that matter, some places also remove the canines. I don't agree with this and a declawed cat of any species is still a wild animal that will take about 3 seconds to decide you are still just a snack. I have delt with exotic animals all of my life and cats were what I used to keep about 100 years and another lifetime ago. It isn't something you can just do, you need to be permitted and have the correct caging to even begin to consider something like that, a wild cat can and will kill you or someone else and it wouldn't take that much effort on their part to do it.

    One thing I used to tell people who want a wild animal, especially a predatory one is this: They are faster then you, stronger then you, meaner then you and when they are not afraid of you it is a very bad combination.

    Most wild cats can't be tamed the way you are probably thinking. Some can, with experience and training, be CAREFULLY handled and touched, but should never be allowed to have any control of the situation. I have had a few that I could go in the cage with or take out on a leash, I raised an orphaned pair of cheetahs that were as close to a pet as I have ever had and a mountain lion that is still alive (he is now part of a breeding program) that was tame enough to handle and I know the people who do handle the animals or go in the cages with them and treat them like a big pet but this is by far the exception and in my opinion not very smart. I have kept "pet" cats as well as rescues (from zoo's or circus animals) as well as bred some cats for public and private animal parks, and it is a full time job that you can not go into at anything less then 100% every time you are around the animal.

    There are some great wild type cats that make great pets, consider something like a captive serval or caracal if you want a pet, and even these need proper care and caging.

    Here are some photos, some of them were my animals (I don't keep much any more, just a female serval as far as cats go and she is in Florida with my girlfriend while I'm in California) others are owned by friends but all of them are still wild animals.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2012
  10. ChooksChick

    ChooksChick BeakHouse's Mad Chicken Scientist

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    There is a real estate monger here in town who also has a hippo and a camel, as well as a zebra.

    He catches a lot of flack for it, because no one thinks it's a good idea. Joke's on him, though, because the hippo took over his horizon pool and it ain't pretty!!
     

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