Thick, DARK EMERALD GREEN droppings, quivering - HELP!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mysweetpeeps, Aug 31, 2008.

  1. mysweetpeeps

    mysweetpeeps Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 31, 2008
    CT
    My rooster has dark emerald green, thickish droppings and I can see he is starting to quiver (mostly when walking). The green is NOT the normal green you may see.

    A few years ago, I had 2 other roosters who had the same symptoms. Slowly, they lost their ability to walk but their appetite seemed good. Eventually, they died. [​IMG]

    I have spent HOURS and HOURS surfing but have not found what it is from or, more importantly, WHAT TO DO!!!!
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2008
  2. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    Could be moldy feed. You might check that ~ and if there is any doubt, replace all feed and thoroughly scrub feeders. Moldy feed can cause death, so I would check immediately.
     
  3. chickenlady

    chickenlady Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 28, 2007
    Stillwater, NJ
    Right now, I agree about the moldy food or some other type of toxin it found. Keep an eye out for limp legs, wings, or neck. That should be the next symptom after shaking.

    Prevention should be aimed at eliminating sources of toxin production and preventing access of birds to such materials. These practices include prompt removal of all dead animals from houses and pens, debeaking the birds, controlling fly and insect populations and avoiding access to decaying organic material. Contaminated water supplies are particularly dangerous.

    If the disease strikes, locate and remove the source of the toxin and separate all visibly affected birds from the flock for treatment. Place sick birds in a cool shaded area and give fresh water into the crop, twice daily. Mild laxatives may be used for birds that have been exposed but do not show disease symptoms. Epsom salts (one pound per 100 birds) may be mixed into feed. Adding a level teaspoonful of Epsom salts in one ounce of water and placing in the crops of sick birds has been beneficial in many instances. Antitoxin therapy is indicated only in birds that have high individual value since the antitoxin is difficult to obtain and is expensive.

    Here is the article this came from:
    http://ultimatefowl.atwiki.com/page/Botulism



    Best of luck to you.
     
  4. d.k

    d.k red-headed stepchild

    * I think I would research liver (hepatic) conditions in chickens and see if you can find something there. As far as advice, that is about the best I can offer. You may also look for any indication or studies of milk thistle treatment of chickens for liver ailments. Best wishes.
     
  5. mysweetpeeps

    mysweetpeeps Out Of The Brooder

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    CT
    Sorry to seeming ask silly questions but....

    Would you be able to see mold on the food?

    He has bumblefoot too. Could that get systemic?

    How do I get water into the crop? I just felt his crop and it is empty, although he is picking on grass.
     
  6. rooster-red

    rooster-red Here comes the Rooster

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    Jun 10, 2007
    Douglasville GA
    Quote:Yes, bumblefoot can go systemic, and it can kill.
     
  7. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    BOCOMO
    Hi. Is this roo, and were the two that died, maintained in an area (or have access to an area) that the rest of your birds don't? Eat different food from a seperate feeder?

    The reason I ask is owing to all three having suffered similar symptoms seperated by quite a bit of time. I'd guess either a toxin, or something like a cryptosporidium (dormant in soil). The dropping color might be symptomatic or just a sign that he's not eating much of anything (dropping bile).

    If you have a vet around take in a sample (only way to be sure).

    If he's not seperated from other birds, do so. I'd pick up both polyvisol (infant liquid vitamins - three drops a day for a wk.), a bottle of ACV (Bargs is a common brand of this vinegar - teaspoon in two cups of water in a PLASTIC bowl), you could try feeding him crushed hard boiled eggs with a little live culture yogurt, as well.

    If you can find someone to prescribe (maybe available without, don't know) Flagyl 250mg. 1 tab a day for 5 days. And pickup Tylan 50 at the feed store (this is what I would do - if our roo was going down, in similar circumstances, i.e., losing roos over years (at the same location?) exhibiting identical symptoms, and I was throwing a `hail mary').
    If your guy makes it, treat that bumble foot.
     
  8. mysweetpeeps

    mysweetpeeps Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 31, 2008
    CT
    Thank you all!!!

    It has been driving me crazy but I think you may have hit the nail on the head with some type of toxin.

    They free range a few hours a day and do scavange in the leave piles (my yard is very woodsy) and it has been humid lately (mold problem). The weird thing is that I purchased them 3 years ago and have all been together since so they share everything, but the hens never had it.

    ivan3 - what would I have them test the sample specifically for?
     
  9. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    BOCOMO
    Sorry, just getting back. Something of a mystery. Same forage as hens. Two roos die years ago of same symptoms that another, at present, is suffering from; hens have been O.K. all along?

    Maybe the roos, consuming more of the contaminant (if that's what it is) than the hens developed it that way (high enough concentration to overwhelm immune response, or too much of whatever it is for the liver to handle, etc.).

    Just call the vet and describe what's going on, most have a specific way they want samples packaged and delivered. They can test for blood/worms/ova/bacteria/etc. At least the vet can use this to rule out quite a few possible candidates.

    Please let us know what you find out.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2008

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