Thin thin thin shells.

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by suderm, Jan 4, 2019.

  1. suderm

    suderm Chirping

    26
    25
    69
    Apr 25, 2017
    Every other day or so I am getting 1 egg that is so thin that it is often broken by other hens laying in the same nesting box.

    They have regular access to layer feed in the coop/run. They also have free access to grit and calcium in the run. I also give them fresh veggies every day (kale, lettuces, fresh corn, tomatoes, squash, discarded shells etc.)

    They are moved around my yard in a 60 sq/ft tractor every day. They do not have calcium in the tractor but do have access to the layer feed as well as whatever they scrounge up in the yard.

    Is there another way to supplement calcium to the entire flock so she is forced to get some. I am assuming that she does not pick through the oyster shell that I have out.

    Or might there be another problem that I am not aware of? Any pointers or ideas?
     
    DobieLover and Shadrach like this.
  2. townchicks

    townchicks Free Ranging

    1,397
    3,953
    516
    Dec 1, 2016
    Contra Costa county, Ca.
    Maybe offer yogurt, perhaps even grind eggshells finely and add to the yogurt. I would also keep a small container of oyster shell in the tractor. You can also get calcium supplement for people to crush and add to any soft food you offer. Or Tums.
     
    DobieLover, Shadrach and Aunt Angus like this.
  3. Shadrach

    Shadrach Roosterist

    2,907
    11,282
    672
    Jul 31, 2018
    Catalonia, Spain
    My Coop
    How old is the hen that lays the thin shelled eggs?
     
  4. suderm

    suderm Chirping

    26
    25
    69
    Apr 25, 2017
    I have 4 all the same age. They will be two years old in a month or two. I am unsure which one is laying the soft egg.
     
    DobieLover, townchicks and Shadrach like this.
  5. Shadrach

    Shadrach Roosterist

    2,907
    11,282
    672
    Jul 31, 2018
    Catalonia, Spain
    My Coop
    I just wondered because older hens; considerably older than your's tend to lay eggs with thiner shells.
    If you could work out which one is laying the thin shelled eggs that would be helpful.
    Once you know, if it is a calcium deficit you could try hand feeding with added calcium and if she still does it you'll know its not lack of calcium.
     
  6. MissChick@dee

    [email protected] ~ Dreaming Of Springtime ~

    3,991
    12,764
    527
    Aug 18, 2017
    Caliente Nevada
    I have a excellent laying hen. She has a cycle in her shell production that sometimes includes extra calcium deposits or a thin shell. Either coming into her taking a day off or going into her starting up again after a day off. She’s a three year old Leghorn. As she gets older I’ve noticed differences. If you have continual soft eggs you could add liquid calcium to their drinking water. But if you have a hen who habitually lays softies there could be a bigger problem. Soft eggs are harder to pass and might be a sign of beginning reproductive problems. What would I do?
    Since yours are all the same age. I’m hoping you can tell who’s who’s I’d watch. Take a chair out and see who lays what. If I couldn’t do that I’d separate them one at a time (in some type of dog kennel or separate tractor) until they lay. Or I’d watch and see if it’s just a hiccup...my LH layed just one softie about a year ago. Freaked me out but I started watching and taking notice of her cycle. On a side note... mine seem to really go after the oyster shell when I put it fresh into their bowl. I’m thinking it triggers them to eat it. Best wishes
     
    ChooksNQuilts and suderm like this.
  7. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Free Ranging

    25,759
    10,173
    727
    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    It isn't just calcium. Calcium and Phosphorus need to be in the correct ratios and sufficient D3 in the body.
     
  8. MissChick@dee

    [email protected] ~ Dreaming Of Springtime ~

    3,991
    12,764
    527
    Aug 18, 2017
    Caliente Nevada
    That’s so true but too much phosphorous and it’ll pull the calcium out of the hens body without the vitamin D3. Right? That’s why a quality feed with lots of good ol’ sunshine and a nice little snack of fish is usually on the menu. For me too(minus the pellets). I only have a few hens and they love fish as a treat.
     
  9. 21hens-incharge

    21hens-incharge Enabler

    10,893
    33,051
    1,232
    Mar 9, 2014
    Northern Colorado
    casportpony and ChickNanny13 like this.
  10. MissChick@dee

    [email protected] ~ Dreaming Of Springtime ~

    3,991
    12,764
    527
    Aug 18, 2017
    Caliente Nevada
    Yes there is a difference IMHO true oyster shell is grey and well...it Looks like an oysters shell that’s been ground. Lol
     
    casportpony and 21hens-incharge like this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: