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Thinking about adding a few of these hens to our flock

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by aileen, Feb 23, 2013.

  1. aileen

    aileen Out Of The Brooder

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    We have one (accidental) rooster and 2 hens. He is just mating the heck out of one of our hens and ignoring the other. We actually quite like the rooster and killing him is not an option for us. We're much too sensitive and don't eat meat anyway. Our white hen has completely lost all the feathers on her back and is just looking terrible. We tried a hen saddle but it keeps falling off. Our solution for now is to separate them during the day and let them all sleep together at night. So we're thinking of getting a few more hens hoping he'll spread the love around. *fingers crossed*

    We still need to build a larger coop (a 4x8 walk in is what we're planning), but we were searching craigslist and came across this ad. These poor things (at least to me) look ragged, thin and tired. What would the dangers be to bringing 2-3 home to our current flock of 3? We would have to keep them separate for a while to watch for disease I'm guessing, right? The place where we're building the new coop is about 10 feet away from the old coop and will be gated off. Would we be able to put them in there for a couple weeks to watch them and make sure they're not sick or is that too close? So many things to think about!
     
  2. brahmabreeder

    brahmabreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Don't get these birds. First off from the looks of things this person doesn't take care of the birds too well. Probably disease ridden. Plus this person trimmed their beaks and they are mature for $5, to him I'm guessing these are just worthless junk. These hens are more than likely past their prime. I can see bleaching in them indicating they have laid for a while. These birds will be more than likely more trouble than it's worth. Your birds could get sick from them and then your whole flock will be screwed. On the other hand there is the very slim chance that these birds could be a steal and you will end up with amazing birds. It's obvious the seller is just into having chickens for the money. Please save the stress and don't get them.
     
  3. brahmabreeder

    brahmabreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I would not buy any of those birds. They look unthrifty and sickly. Their feathers are in horrible condition and not a single one has a plump red comb, their combs all look anemic. I'd be afraid of them introducing illness/parasites/behaviors into my current flock. Or, your current birds might decide they're in too poor shape and try to kill them. Birds don't tolerate weakness well.


    That said, if you really, really want some of those hens, you'd have to completely quarantine them. I don't think ten feet is near enough. I'm talking not sharing air space, changing footwear between coops, the whole nine yards for quarantine. Or, accept you might lose your current birds.
     
  5. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    X2. The risk of bringing in disease is great. A bird can be a carrier of a disease and not show any sign or symptom of it for a long time. And few people are up to doing an actual, effective quarantine as donrae described. Most people just keep birds physically separate and call it quarantine but viruses can easily be carried on your clothes, shoes, even your skin and hair to another coop, not to mention simply being airborn. Some diseases, once on your property, are there to stay for a very long time. It's even a calculated risk bringing in new birds from a healthy source that are in good condition, not to mention birds that are in poor condition for whatever reason.
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Are they anemic or young? My first thought was that they were young as they say they haven't layed yet.

    I don't see nipped beaks or bad feathers either, actually can't see much of the birds.

    Might be worth a call and/or a visit, tho quarantine practices are always good, 30 feet away for 30 days is a rule of thumb I've heard and no corss contamination with shoes clothes equipment.
     
  7. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    the link now goes to a different ad. The first one had a crapton of leghorn hens in a small area, they all looked scraggly and the combs were all very light pink and icky looking.

    I didn't mean the birds were actually anemic, that's not why combs are pale. It was just the first thing to come to mind after dealing with a patient with persistent gi bleeding this last week.
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Ohhh so we were talking about different pics! The ones I saw looked pretty good! Sorrry.
     

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