Thinking about getting into soap making...opinions

Discussion in 'Hobbies' started by CranberryCreekFarm, May 12, 2011.

  1. CranberryCreekFarm

    CranberryCreekFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 6, 2011
    Maine
    I really want to try my hand at soap making ( pregnant and nesting ). Starting small of course to sell with my farm things. My question is : Do you think it would be innappropriate to sell goats milk soap when I don't have any does and would be buying it from someone else? I would be using my own lavender, and other organic ingriedients purchased online at what seems to be a very nice reputable place with good quality ingriedients.
    I was thinking I'd use a goats milk base and start with all natural unscented, lavender, and oatmeal to start. I've attended farm swaps around the state and haven't found anyone yet that sells there. And also I think I could sell locally to people I know since there isn't anyone around here that makes soaps and etc. Thoughts? and tips from those who already make and sell? How much are people willing to pay for a bar of handmade organic soap?


    Thanks so much! [​IMG]
     
  2. TheBrumstead

    TheBrumstead Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 9, 2011
    Hobart, IN
    You can also use canned goat's milk. That's what I did when I made soaps. I don't see why you couldn't use someone else's goats milk.

    You said "base", are you using melt & pour? Melt & pour is certainly the easiest to make, but is the hardest to add liquid additives to. Make sure you test, test, test... and get insurance. People are sue-happy and won't hesitate to sue you if you formulate something wrong and they have a reaction, ie too much lye (not an issue with MP) or too much fragrance. That's why I stopped selling, I was getting too concerned that someone may have a reaction even though I tested everything thoroughly.

    Have you checked out etsy.com? That can give you a good idea of what people may pay for a bar of organic. I never did organic but had no problem getting $3 for a simple 4 oz bar to $6 for a fancier, more involved bar.
     
  3. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Escanaba, MI
    I don't recommend selling soap without insurance. Too many things can go wrong. You can have every ingredient listed in very big, very bold letters, but someone can still buy it, have a reaction to a known allergen, and sue you. They may not win, but the fees you spent to defend yourself will hurt.

    Also, melt and pour is like cheating. Hot process and cold process soap is pretty darn easy still, and you don't have to waste money with bases. You know exactly what goes into the soap, because you put it there. Sure, it means using lye, but proper safety steps should be taken when working with any chemical.
     
  4. CranberryCreekFarm

    CranberryCreekFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I was looking into both the melt and pour as well as the lye. I would be using local oils and herbs and milk from around teh area or my own farm. Very true about suing people, its pretty sad these days. I had a few intricate molds I wanted to try and was going to attempt 5.00 each. Running the idea to my husband tonight. Lets see if he thinks this is a good idea, or just another pregnancy nesting phase ( went through 50 flower pots seeds and etc in one night ) [​IMG] Thank you for your input!
     
  5. Morgaine

    Morgaine Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 22, 2008
    Texas
    I'm not saying this to be mean or discourage you, but you need to make sure that you make a product that is sellable before you even start selling. You need to find your formula (It took me 6 months to get my recipe just the way I wanted) and then you need to see how the soap ages. Will it go rancid, will it discolor, will the scent last. These are all things you need to know before you sell. I have people already buying Christmas gifts. How bad would I look if the soap lost it's scent in that time. It takes time to find these things out. But it is fun to test!!

    There are some other soap threads that have a ton of info in them!!
     
  6. TheBrumstead

    TheBrumstead Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I chose MP because we were trying for my son and I didn't want to mess with lye (dangerous fumes, etc). I found plenty of other more experienced soap makers to buy lye soap from! MP is quite fun though, even if you don't end up selling it.
     
  7. Morgaine

    Morgaine Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 22, 2008
    Texas
    Melt and pour is great to start if you want to start selling right away and there are some beautiful works of art mp soap. I think they both have their places. But I love making the lye soap, that is what draws me.
     
  8. CranberryCreekFarm

    CranberryCreekFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No worries about discouraging. I don't need to start selling tomorow, Just trying to think of another hobby I can do year round. I enjoy farming and gardening, but I need something to do in the winter! I get all depressed and crazy then ( and I have no serious painting or drawing talents)!
    [​IMG]
    Plus, I would love to enjoy more natural products! I ordered some goats milk oatmeal soap and it made my skin feel awesome, also helped with the itchy strechmarks when I was pregnant with my 2nd.

    Thanks for the input everyone [​IMG]
     
  9. judikins

    judikins Out Of The Brooder

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    oh I hear ya there..so I started quilting in winter..to a small degree cause I start setting seeds in Jan..but the quilting in fun..along with crochet,,I exhibit at the state fair here in South Dakota,,along with market gardening..but I agree,,winter can be the pits if ya let it get ahead of ya...[​IMG] Judi
     

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