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Thinking of "adopting" this dog - we're crazy right?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by gritsar, Sep 6, 2010.

  1. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    My DSD is staying with us while she goes through a seperation. Actually she's staying with us part-time, as she goes to her mother's house whenever she senses that I'm about to climb the walls (me = obsessive housecleaner, her = slob, get the picture?).
    She brought with her the 4 year old grandson and her chihuahua Rudy, who is almost a year old.

    Rudy was a novelty for her and the novelty has worn off. I told her when she arrived that since Rudy was not housebroken (i.e., she lets him pee and poop wherever he wants in her house) that he would either have to stay under her direct control, in his crate or in the kitchen. His crate is a very large one, that we used when our GSDs were babies. Well, DSD doesn't want the hassle of keeping Rudy under her control and she doesn't like to hear him whine when he's in the kitchen, so he spends alot time in his crate. Rudy has had accidents in his crate many times. She feeds him and takes him out only when she thinks about it.

    The other day DSD went to stay with her mom for a few days and three hours later realized that she had left Rudy with us. She sent me a text message apologizing for leaving him behind and asked me to please take care of him and not be mad. I told her I would, no problem.

    So, DH and I talked about it and we are thinking of asking DSD to give us Rudy. Rudy and our older GSD are good friends, having been introduced when they were both puppies and our younger GSD Kane is learning to ignore Rudy.

    The problem is, I'm not sure I'm up to the work it would take to housebreak an adult dog; especially since Rudy's been allowed to mess in his crate, making crate training that much more difficult. The big problem is that Rudy is an unneutered male, so even if I do get him to poo and pee outside (which sometimes means waiting outside with him for an hour or better), he still reserves enough urine to come in the house and lift his leg on furniture.

    If we keep Rudy, we intend to take him to the vet to complete his shots - something else that was never done - and get him neutered.

    Is he too old for neutering to have an effect on his leg lifting? I'm not looking forward to housebreaking him. I was spoiled by Jax and Kane being so easy to crate train. Jax was crate trained immediately and Kane only took a week.

    Rudy should be DSD's problem, but she obviously won't and really can't afford to while she's getting on her feet.
     
  2. jerseygirl1

    jerseygirl1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You're not crazy
    I'd do it in a heartbeat if I were even half as experienced as keeping dogs as you
    I have my two, they have good and bad times - but they are great dogs
    As far as the training, mine were adults and already trained, so I haven't got a clue

    But I hope it works out for all of you!!
     
  3. Rusty Hills Farm

    Rusty Hills Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 3, 2008
    Up at the barn
    Is he too old for neutering to have an effect on his leg lifting? I'm not looking forward to housebreaking him. I was spoiled by Jax and Kane being so easy to crate train. Jax was crate trained immediately and Kane only took a week.

    I used to live with a fellow who had a Chihuahua. The BEST he could do was get the dog to "agree" to use a puppy pad IF he cleaned it every single time the dog used it. Otherwise Pico would lift his leg on everything and poop behind the furniture--this after walking him 5-6 times a day. BTW he was neutered early and it didn't help with the leg-lifting at all. And Denis was religious about walking him and rewarding him every single time he did what he was supposed to do where he was supposed to do it. But NOTHING worked.

    Give me a big dog every time. Now if one of your guys was female, you might have the female telling you every time he had an "accident", which is what happened in Pico's case. My female collie was so fastidious that she would lick up any liquid accidents and tell us about the solid ones. [​IMG]

    All I can say is, good luck housebreaking him!

    Rusty​
     
  4. Surehatch

    Surehatch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Adopt a dog if you want a new best friend
     
  5. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:I used to live with a fellow who had a Chihuahua. The BEST he could do was get the dog to "agree" to use a puppy pad IF he cleaned it every single time the dog used it. Otherwise Pico would lift his leg on everything and poop behind the furniture--this after walking him 5-6 times a day. BTW he was neutered early and it didn't help with the leg-lifting at all. And Denis was religious about walking him and rewarding him every single time he did what he was supposed to do where he was supposed to do it. But NOTHING worked.

    Give me a big dog every time. Now if one of your guys was female, you might have the female telling you every time he had an "accident", which is what happened in Pico's case. My female collie was so fastidious that she would lick up any liquid accidents and tell us about the solid ones. [​IMG]

    All I can say is, good luck housebreaking him!

    Rusty

    Yes, I fear alot of the housebreaking issue may have to do with the fact that he is a chihuahua. I have owned three chihuahuas before, but they were all housebroken by us at an early age. Rudy is already old enough to be set in his ways. The first thing I do after DSD leaves is to check behind the furnitue for deposits - sneaky little devil. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2010
  6. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:This is my best friend Kane, all 95 lbs. of him:


    [​IMG]


    If we adopt Rudy it will be for his sake, not ours.
     
  7. Epona142

    Epona142 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Belly bands can be a lifesaver. I've had several foster dogs pee on themselves a couple times, then quickly figure out peeing in the house wasn't real fun...
     
  8. NurseELB

    NurseELB Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lacey, WA
    If you put Rudy into a much smaller crate, one that he can turn around in of course, it will make it easier to train him. If they can't avoid stepping in it, or having to lay in it they are WAY less likely to mess there. Good Luck!
     
  9. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

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    I have a Yorkie stud that would lift his leg in the house when ever he felt that he needed to assert his manhood. That was rather often. Once we had him neutered he no longer seems to feel the need as much anymore. I can't say that I trust him entirely, but it certainly has reduced the occasions in which he feels the need. I would think that with careful watching, and a small kennel, you would have success quickly.
     
  10. RiverOtter

    RiverOtter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] You are not crazy. It is just hard to look at that tiny, cute, bundle of arrogance and see the steps.
    Step 1 Neuter
    2 Treat him like a big dog
    3 A proportional crate. Small enough that if he pees, he gets wet - like a big dog
    4 Belly band in the house until he's trained.
    4 Pretend he's just like Jax or Kane and train him the same way. If you didn't use a leash like an umbilical cord with either of them then do it with this guy. He can't sneak off if he can't get more then 6 feet from you.

    It is hard, but an older dog can be housebroken successfully. You're not that long from the puppy routine with your last.

    Now retraining DSD? Sadly that's impossible. Unless you can rig the shock collar so she can't get it off.....
     

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