Thinking of changing my major..

Discussion in 'Family Life - Stories, Pictures & Updates' started by sune42, Mar 27, 2011.

  1. sune42

    sune42 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I decided to go to college finally when I was 26, I had previously gone to cosmetology school, but it really wasn't all I hoped it would be. I really had no idea what I wanted to major in, what I wanted to do with my life. I decided on art education because I liked the idea of being a teacher and I have always been artistic. After postponing for a year because I had my 1st daughter, I started.

    Classes have been difficult, and I haven't done very well in my studio classes. I feel like I never have time to finish a 32x18 self portrait. (for example) It's a lot of work, I don't want to sound like I am whining, but I guess I am a little.

    Over the past couple of years I have started making a lot of personal changes. Organic, local, sustainable, humane are all much more important words to me then they were when I started school. I have taken this semester off because I was trying to find a job and it has given me time to think. I really am not looking forward to going back, and was already thinking of doing only general education requirements this semester, no art classes. So recently I have started thinking about changing my major. Food Science, agriculture, horticultural, dietitian or nutritionist are all ideas going through my head. My current school offers none of those, but does have an environmental sciences major. UC, which is a stone throw away has a Dietetics, Horticulture, and Food and Nutrition degrees. I know for a fact that I get in state tuition for Horticulture, unsure about the other two. Then there is the University of Kentucky which has a College of Ag, with an agriculture degree. We would have to move to do this, so I would try to do every thing I could up here before. But UK is pricey, very pricey.

    Does anyone have a degree in any of these fields? Or work in these fields and can give me a bit of information? I just feel that I am more passionate about this then my current major, and that I should go with my passion.

    Thanks
    amanda
     
  2. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    I'm a biology major but I've taken several enviromental and marine bio classes. Enviromental science classes never fail to interest me, but some of them are pretty difficult. At my school you have to take things like hydrology, geology and soil science. I have not taken those and they sound like the more difficult core classes of the major, but the major itself offers some other really exciting and fun classes. I know here you also have to take chemistry, physics, and bio classes, plus a math or two. That would be the only issue I see with switching your major is that you probably won't have much from the art major that will transfer, but I certainly recommend switching if you are not enjoying art. The major itself is not all that important for many jobs after you graduate, unless it is something very specialized, so you should always major in something you enjoy and can do well in.

    I switched from crim justice to biology and it set me back a bit, but it was totally worth it. I have to go one extra semester (this next one will be my last) but I really enjoy biology and I am looking forward to continuing my education after getting my undergrad degree.

    A lot of my friends with environmental sci majors are applying for jobs now and there are some very interesting openings working in all different places. Some are with state parks, others with companies, and some working for the government. I have one friend who is an envl major but is trying to go to grad school for global leadership. So really, there are a lot of options out there, some more related to the field than others!

    Good luck in whatever you choose!

    (BTW, sustainable agriculture is now a huge field. I'm taking a class in that right now and it is so interesting. My professor often brings in speakers who do agriculturally related things with their degree and I am always in awe. One of them works for an organic group in New jersey that helps certify farmers to be organic. Really neat stuff!)
     
  3. sune42

    sune42 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for your thoughts Chickerdoodle, I appreciate it.

    Luckily I only go part time and it's usually been one art, one gen ed so I won't loose too much. I guess that I worry that I will do this and change my mind again. IDK
     
  4. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    I would recommend talking with some of the enviromental science professors and perhaps sitting in on one or two of their classes if you can. That way you will get a sort of "feel" for the major without any real commitment. You could also take a science class that would count either towards that major if you should decide to go that route or as a distance course (They are called "At Some Distance" courses here at my school, but that basically just means a course counting towards your degree, but different from your core classes).

    Also, see if you might be able to talk to some students already in the major you are interested in switching to. Like I said, for me switching to biology worked out perfectly. I really enjoy the subjects and the courses I've had to take. It hasn't been easy, but I don't think I would have enjoyed crim justice quite as much.

    Also, look and see if you might be able to put your art classes towards a minor. That way if you feel you'd rather teach art than do something with an environmental science degree, you can just get the teaching certificate and you would still be able to teach. Many of my teachers throughout middle and high school were teaching subjects they had minors in and were not even remotely related to their majors. I had a math teacher who also taught spanish (his minor), a history teacher who went back and forth between that and psychology, and another teacher who taught either science or history. It's difficult to wrap your mind around it sometimes, but in the real world it's not really what you have a degree in but whether or not you did well in the classes you took. Unless you are going for nursing or PT or something very specialized. Heck, even in the medical field many med schools are accepting english majors that meet the criteria over bio students because it is so common. Personally, I think it is more important to do well in something you enjoy!
     
  5. annaraven

    annaraven Born this way

    Apr 15, 2010
    SillyCon Valley
    Definitely talk with an advisor in those fields and see what of your credits will transfer. Try taking some classes in the areas of interest to see what really excites you in reality vs in theory. I just got my degree last June, after switching majors, so I know how much something can look really interesting from the outside but then the actual degree itself isn't interesting, or the way it's taught or some required class or prereq makes it less interesting.

    Following your passion is never a bad idea.
     
  6. sune42

    sune42 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was planning on getting information about all the fields and talking to advisors in each one. I didn't see about auditing a class, I will have to check into how that works. Thanks again all!
     
  7. Mattemma

    Mattemma Overrun With Chickens

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    I am not in those fields,but wanted to say change! I was getting a gerontology degree and was in my last year when I decided that I did not want to be a long term care administrator.Being *the boss* I realised was not the life I wanted to live. I still got the gerontology degree,but did not do the things to specialize in administration. I gave up what I am sure was a good income,but I would have hated that life.
     
  8. flgardengirl

    flgardengirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sunny side up :)
    Quote:Many kids change thier majors in college, several times even. College is somewhere that you are exposed to many new ideas. It is a place to find out what you like and are good at. Now people are going to school when they are older and have more life experience but you are still learning new things. So yes, its okay to change your major and your mind. It is better to do something you really like to do than to be stuck in something you don't like even if it paid better or whatever.

    My son started in Computer Programming and now also wants to do Pharm D so he is double majoring. My other son is still deciding and that is okay too.
    Do what you love!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2011
  9. sune42

    sune42 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I agree, it just makes me nervous because I will be 31 this year, I feel like I don't really have the liberty of changing around a lot. I also agree with the doing what you like, not what will pay you well. I want to feed my kids, buy our farm someday, but I don't need to make the big bucks.

    I finally got a job, started yesterday, so now I can look into going back. I am ordering info on the majors today.
     

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