This may sound like a silly question but...

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by kees, May 24, 2008.

  1. kees

    kees Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 5, 2008
    If I ordered Red Bro Broilers, instead of butchering all of them, can I keep some of them so that they will reproduce?
     
  2. Sonia

    Sonia Chillin' With My Peeps

    743
    8
    153
    Apr 19, 2008
    SE Oklahoma
    ..............
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2008
  3. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

    4,889
    16
    261
    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    Of course you can! But, just like any other boriler, they are hybrids. You cannot rebreed hybrids with predictable results and will get rather chaotic offspring.

    But if you're doing it for yourself and your own table, I would sire a Dark Cornish to the Red Bro's. If you're planning to sell birds, though, you really need to be using commercial broilers since it's difficult to market a lot of birds who all look different. [​IMG]
     
  4. kees

    kees Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 5, 2008
    Actually, I was going to raise them for meat. Instead of siring it with another bird, maybe I'm better off just buying new chicks each year.
     
  5. Sonia

    Sonia Chillin' With My Peeps

    743
    8
    153
    Apr 19, 2008
    SE Oklahoma
    ..............
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2008
  6. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

    4,889
    16
    261
    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    This quesiton is debated a lot. Yes you can get some 'dual purpose' utility out of rebreeding your hybrid broilers. But, you just have to accept that when you mate a Red Bro to a Red Bro, the offspring are NOT Red Bro's. This is just like people who keep Cornish Crosses then rebreed them thinking they'll get Cornish Crosses again. There is little heterosis in the 2nd pairing and you get birds which grow differently.

    Here is what I have concluded is best:

    1) Buy broilers as day olds each year. Raise them as a crop, rather than maintaining a "breeding flock" simply so you can impulsively grow some meat chickens.

    2) The advantages of growing as a crop is that the meat birds really ought have their own ration and be separated from the rest of your laying flock, who will have different nutritional requirements. So, since you need two separate feeding systems, why go through the work of having two entirely separate flocks to manage?

    3) With vacuum sealing technology being so good and affordable in teh home, and the advent of frost free freezers, you can freeze your crop of broilers and lose little or no quality in the meat. This method means you deal with the meat birds 8-10 weeks, then you can put the equipment and tractor away until the next year. Labor saved.

    p.s. someone is going to bring up dual purpose breeds, but realize that any purebred chicken is going to be disappointing as a meat bird. They don't grow as large, they grow slowly (15+ weeks to eating size), do not convert feed well and their body conformation is all wrong. The keel protrudes and they seem skinny. If you truly like a nice roasting chicken, then you really have to stick with commercial broilers.
     
  7. kees

    kees Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 5, 2008
    I didn't know that any other bird would seem skinny compared to the meat bird. Thanks for saving me from some disappointment!
     
  8. ronshoney

    ronshoney Chillin' With My Peeps

    109
    0
    129
    Nov 7, 2007
    Algonac, Michigan
    They do seem skinny! I got a cornish cross by accident with my layers......... he was supposed to be my bo rooster and they are three weeks old now and he is huge compared to them. The kids kept accidently sticking him with the turkeys, but he does look like a monster compared to them...... and very ....... meaty.[​IMG]
     
  9. kees

    kees Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 5, 2008
    That's so funny that the kids keep sticking him with the turkeys. I wonder what he's thinking![​IMG]
     
  10. willheveland

    willheveland Chillin' With My Peeps

    946
    12
    161
    Jan 29, 2008
    southern tier,NY
    Quote:I think it easier and more conveinant to order chicks for each batch you do.This way you can almost plan to the day when you will be getting them and they will all be the same size and age.Then once they are done you are done til the next batch.You need a break in between batches. Will
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by