Tim, your attention is requested....

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Dustin Biery, Aug 11, 2008.

  1. Dustin Biery

    Dustin Biery Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 4, 2007
    Mulberry, Arkansas
    Ok, so I have been told that it takes a buff, columbian, and mottled gene to create a millie pattern, is this correct? I have also been told that you can do it with partridge, gold laced, and mottled? Any ideas?

    Next problem...What will be the probably results if you cross a buff columbian female to a blue mottled male?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 19, 2008
    Missouri
    Quote:Dustin,

    The buff color in a mille is produced by the interaction of the columbian gene, the sex linked gold gene and the dominant wheaten gene. Darker ( as in more eumelanin or black pigment) colored milli are most likely brown and not wheaten. The buff in the milli is different than the buff that would be found in the buff leghorn or buff orpington.

    eWh/eWh , Co/Co, mo/mo, s+/s+ or s+/_. e+/e+ wild type and eb/eb will also produce a millie

    Partridge lacks the columbian gene and also has pg or the pattern gene that you will have to breed out.
    gold laced has the columbian gene that you need but also has the pattern gene and melanotic gene that you will have to breed out

    Crossing a buff columbian female to a blue mottled male will produce basically blue and black offspring that will be leaking silver or gold. They would carry one mottling gene.

    I do not know if the blue carries silver or gold. But I do know that the male offspring will at least carry one gold gene from the hen. I would do a sibling cross with two black birds, if you hatch enough birds you should get what you want or a bird close to what you want. The odds are not very good about three chances in 64. Most of the offspring will be black, some will be black and mottled, and 1 in 64 will be wheaten and mottled and some will be wheaten, some will be homozygous(two columbian genes) buff columbian and some will be heterozygous (split) buff columbian (these birds will have stippling on there backs) . If the blue bird has melanotic, and most likely it does, then some of the wheaten birds will have a dark brown head, hackles and back.

    Does not sound to good, it would be best to just buy a milli.



    Tim
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2008
  3. Krys109uk

    Krys109uk Chillin' With My Peeps

    Speckled sussex, carry Mh (they're on wheaten). But then they are darker than other basically mille fleur coloured birds.
     
  4. Hi Dustin! Forgive me for reading a message intended for someone else, but I thought it *might* be interesting and couldn't resist [​IMG]
    I was right, it is interesting [​IMG]

    This pullet is the result of an accidental mating of a poorly-laced Polish cross roo and a mottled Cochin hen.

    [​IMG]

    She (and the other surprise youngsters that look like her) are kind of interesting. All look Cochin-y, except for slate legs/feet.

    What do you think? I'm not sure what mille fleur birds are *supposed* to look like.
    I know it isn't mille fleur, but would crossing back to a mottled Cochin make a mille fleur coloring?

    I don't care for brown-ish birds, so it isn't something I'd likely pursue --- just curious.
    [​IMG]
    Lisa
     
  5. Dustin Biery

    Dustin Biery Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 4, 2007
    Mulberry, Arkansas
    Well any responses are gratefully accepted. I was just curious. I am progressing forward with this millie project, but I didn't think it was going to be that difficult. I knew it was going to be hard, but not as difficult as it has been explained. Thanks for all the information, and anything that can be further added to this topic is also greatly appreciated.

    Thanks again everyone!
     
  6. Krys109uk

    Krys109uk Chillin' With My Peeps

    Hello Dustin,
    I'm in the process of recreating Jubilee Orpingtons (Mille fluer colour) in US. It is not easy, & maybe I ought to have gone a different route. I'm having trouble cleaning up & just when some seem to be approaching what I want, disaster strikes----c'est la vie.

    Hwyl fawr
    Krys
     
  7. Dustin Biery

    Dustin Biery Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 4, 2007
    Mulberry, Arkansas
    Krys,

    Would be interested in sharing what you have done of that project? Any help towards my goal would be greatly appreciated.
     
  8. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 19, 2008
    Missouri
    Quote:Dustin,

    I did not want to be a downer. I just wanted to let you know it would not be easy. Would be a great long term project. You go for it. You will have fun in the process and learn some more genetics.

    Krys,

    I would like to also read about your work.

    Tim
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2008
  9. Dustin Biery

    Dustin Biery Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 4, 2007
    Mulberry, Arkansas
    Tim, I more than understood what you were trying to get at. I just cant pull myself to buy them. I would much rather work towards a line that I can be proud of. Tim, can you direct me to any books that are reasonably priced so that I can learn about genetics more!
     
  10. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 19, 2008
    Missouri
    Dustin,

    My suggestion is that you learn all you can about the genetics of the birds you have. Concentrate on the genes found in the birds you work with. Forget all the other genes for now. There is too much to learn. I have systematically learned what I can about the genes. I am now going into depth and reading papers on the genes and analyzing the information concerning each gene and how one gene effects another gene etc.

    Get your self a notebook and start writing down the information in your own words. If you need help, just post and when I get time I will answer. I will be going back to work so I will be putting in 10 hour days Monday -Friday- so be patient I will answer.

    Leave 4 pages for each gene in the notebook.

    Tim
     

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