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time of year to start with chicks?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by mamaschwab, Jun 5, 2012.

  1. mamaschwab

    mamaschwab New Egg

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    Jun 5, 2012
    We are eagerly anticipating the arrival of our first chicks in early September (we will be away most of the summer which is why we are waiting). We just heard that that time of year is not ideal for starting chicks, something to do with their molting cycle. Any thoughts on this? Will late July, early August make a big difference?
    Thank you!
     
  2. n8ivetxn

    n8ivetxn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 15, 2011
    Elma, Washington
    IMHO, it depends on what part of the country you live....when heat subsides, cold sets in, etc. I would at least like to have them feathered enought to go outside before it starts freezing. The transition would be easier on them.

    However, that being said, chickens have existed without our interference for quite some time [​IMG] I tend to be over-protective with my chicks!
     
  3. mamaschwab

    mamaschwab New Egg

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    Jun 5, 2012
    Thanks! We are in Massachusetts, outside of Boston.
     
  4. n8ivetxn

    n8ivetxn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 15, 2011
    Elma, Washington
    [​IMG]

    Oh yeah, if ya'll have nice fall weather, not too cold, it should be a fine time to start some chicks!
     
  5. loanwizard

    loanwizard Chillin' With My Peeps

    There is no wrong time to hatch chicks. That said, from a practical standpoint, heated waterbowls, extra heat lamps... North of 84 is colder than south... just kidding ;)

    Getting them to 3-4 weeks old is the only issue. I raised them in the basement, but only until I got my trailer/Brooder set up. I took a utility trailer (learned it here BTW), boxed in 3 sides with a door, wired the top with fencing, tarped it, added 2 heat lamps and 2 5 gallon bucket waterers with nipples ( I raise more than 100 at a time), put in the wood shavings and voila! All set to raise them. If it is really cold they stay in the brooder til 4 even 5 weeks. If it is really really cold, the brooder comes into the barn or garage.
     

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