Timid Girl Turns Mean

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by meechie, Dec 17, 2012.

  1. meechie

    meechie New Egg

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    Dec 17, 2012
    I only have 3 hens who have been together since the start. All three very sweet, but the larger two always hung out together and nested together leaving "Nugget" the odd girl out. Because of this we have always given her more attention and therefore she is the most accepting of my children's "affection." Today I noticed after being in their coop for two days, Nugget was being mean. She kept bumping chests with the others and pecking their combs. Any thoughts about this? Is it just cabin fever or a diet issue? Nugget has also been inconsistent in laying compared to her sisters all along. Funny thing is that her eggs are cream colored compared to the others that are brown and they are all the same breed. Thanks! I look forward to hearing from you all.
     
  2. XavCas

    XavCas Out Of The Brooder

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    She may just think she is the head chicken now since you are giving her more attention, or she could have just changed her mind and got tired of being on the bottom of the pecking order. My chickens do that sometimes; they get tired of being at the bottom and bossed around so they " fight " to go to the top.
     
  3. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    [​IMG] I'm guessing that Nugget no longer wants to stay at the bottom of the pecking order and is trying to elevate her status. As long as excessive bleeding or injury is not happening, I would just let them work things out. The fact that they are cooped up may have initiated the behavior. I seriously doubt that it is a dietary or nutritional issue.
     
  4. HouseCat

    HouseCat Chillin' With My Peeps

    Based on the egg color and aggressive behaviour, it sounds to me like Nugget has some Game Hen blood in her. Chickens of the same breed seem to flock together. That could be the reason that she has never been accepted into their club. Game hens, especially when they are coming up on their first year, can get aggressive as their hormones kick in. Do you happen to have any photos of her you could post?
     
  5. meechie

    meechie New Egg

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    Dec 17, 2012
    That is my girl " Nugget" as my avatar. They were purchased all at Tractor Supply in the "red" bin. The only way I can tell the difference between them is that her comb is a little smaller and she's the most affectionate.
     
  6. HouseCat

    HouseCat Chillin' With My Peeps

    Although Game cocks and hens have a tendency to turn Chicken aggressive, they can be the most affectionate when it comes to their keepers. My game hens are the friendliest chickens I've got. They tap on the tops of my shoes when they want to be picked up and if I continue to ignore them, they'll fly up on my shoulder and pull at my ear. They also get very jealous if I'm holding another chicken that isn't them.
    Tractor Supply chics are far from pure bred and it isn't uncommon for a rooster to jump into a different breeding pen and muck-up the gene pool. There aren't many breeds, other than Games, that have red earlobes and lay white/cream eggs. No doubt if she's Game, she'll turn out to be one of the most loyal, affectionate, and memorable girls in your flock.
     
  7. meechie

    meechie New Egg

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    Dec 17, 2012
    Thanks so much for your response. I have always wondered abou her egg color. I originally purchased 6 and gave three to my sister. Her girls lay all brown as well.
    Besides eating her, what else can you do keep her from becoming too aggressive and causing the others bodily harm?
     
  8. HouseCat

    HouseCat Chillin' With My Peeps

    She'll most likely settle down once she feels like the other hens respect her new position in the pecking order. Although her laying won't be as consistent as the other two hens, she will defend herself, her babies, and her territory/flockmates from invading threats. They're tough little birds and can give the average rooster a run for it's money.
     

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