Tin roof or...?

Jonessa

Songster
Apr 20, 2017
122
76
116
Vancouver Island
Hey folks,

We're building our coop this week, woohoo! It will be a lean-to style walk-in shed coop. On our previous cop we did plywood under galvanized tin for the roof, which worked great! But lumber prices are through the roof (haha) right now, so we were thinking we'd just do the tin on it's own. BUT I have a couple of concerns.
First, how will the bare tin affect temperature and condensation? It's an 8x8 structure, and we are leaving the top 1 foot of the walls at the front and back, and then a sloping section (1 foot towards the front, diminishing toward the back) along each side wall, as mesh, so lots of ventilation for my 7 hens. We get hot dry summers (into the high 30s C) and winters can have one-two week spells of temps in the -25 C range, with a couple feet of snow over the winter. The coop will be in the shade almost all day.
Second, if we do just tin, how do we secure the high spots of the corrugations? We'll do a front wood piece butting up against the strapping, and the underside of the overhang will be mesh - but that still leaves those little openings.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 27, 2012
87,695
105,703
1,737
SW Michigan
My Coop
First, how will the bare tin affect temperature and condensation?
The high ventilation all around might discourage condensation, but I wouldn't count on it.
I'd put something under the tin...maybe just 'tar paper'.

but that still leaves those little openings.
They do have those foam gaskets made to fill those spaces, should keep most things out.
 

Alaskan

The Frosted Flake
Premium Feather Member
Jul 26, 2008
31,680
60,081
1,392
Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
My Coop
Hey folks,

We're building our coop this week, woohoo! It will be a lean-to style walk-in shed coop. On our previous cop we did plywood under galvanized tin for the roof, which worked great! But lumber prices are through the roof (haha) right now, so we were thinking we'd just do the tin on it's own. BUT I have a couple of concerns.
First, how will the bare tin affect temperature and condensation? It's an 8x8 structure, and we are leaving the top 1 foot of the walls at the front and back, and then a sloping section (1 foot towards the front, diminishing toward the back) along each side wall, as mesh, so lots of ventilation for my 7 hens. We get hot dry summers (into the high 30s C) and winters can have one-two week spells of temps in the -25 C range, with a couple feet of snow over the winter. The coop will be in the shade almost all day.
Second, if we do just tin, how do we secure the high spots of the corrugations? We'll do a front wood piece butting up against the strapping, and the underside of the overhang will be mesh - but that still leaves those little openings.
I have a coop with a metal roof, where the metal sits directly on the frame. So no plywood or whatever. I haven't noticed any condensation but then it is super sloped, so any moisture would just slide to the side where I wouldn't notice.

However, without any support under the metal do make the roof STEEP so it never has to hold snow.

I would just use tin. Corrugated roofing is fastened in valleys with screws and bonded rubber washers. You can buy closure strips for preditor protection.
Yes, those ripple boards match up to the ripples in the metal. There are actually a few different kinds so you can match up perfectly.
 

tsperry88

Songster
Mar 30, 2020
320
276
103
Fredericksburg, VA
I have the same size coop with a metal roof, and you need supports under the roof. Otherwise, there's nothing to nail it to and it will eventually sag.
Typically purlins run perpendicular to the roof panels. It's done this way in areas with moderate snow load requirements as well. At least it's allowed here in VA
 

Attachments

BigLar368

Chirping
Jun 12, 2020
146
246
73
Southeast Texas
Typically purlins run perpendicular to the roof panels. It's done this way in areas with moderate snow load requirements as well. At least it's allowed here in VA
This is what I did (basically same as tsperry 88 post) and left about a 3" gap at the top all the way around the top for ventilation on a single slope roof for the coop and entire run.

We live in an extremely humid area and I have yet to see any condensation build up inside the coop.

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aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 27, 2012
87,695
105,703
1,737
SW Michigan
My Coop
We live in an extremely humid area and I have yet to see any condensation build up inside the coop.
Condensation happens when the tin gets cold and the air is still fairly warm and humid.

Where in this world are you located @BigLar368 36 ?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
1603544542782.png
 

BigLar368

Chirping
Jun 12, 2020
146
246
73
Southeast Texas
Condensation happens when the tin gets cold and the air is still fairly warm and humid.

Where in this world are you located @BigLar368 36 ?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
View attachment 2385153
We live in Southeast Texas about 20 miles from the coast.
 

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