Tips to raising a GOOD rooster?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Happy Chooks, Nov 7, 2009.

  1. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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    From my hatching, I ended up with 3 cockerals. They are 2 weeks old. I know I can't keep all of them, and I'm not planning to. I've never had a rooster before, but I would like to keep one of them.


    So, do you have any tips on raising a good rooster? Things that have worked for you? I know it's an individual thing, and there are no guarantees, but I'd like to have the best chance of getting this right.
     
  2. MaggieRae

    MaggieRae Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 12, 2009
    North Texas
    Um...

    Well. Don't let your rooster train you.
    Mine learned if he crowed a lot, Maggie will come get him and let him watch the news with her until the neighbors woke up...
    Silly rooster.
     
  3. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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    Quote:[​IMG]

    No problems there, we're on 5 acres so I'm not worrying about the neighbors. Besides, their dogs bark A LOT, so I'm not too concerned.
     
  4. OpheliaChick

    OpheliaChick Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm still new to this but what I did with my rooster was handle him a lot. I would make sure he was picked up at least once a day. He is now 21 weeks old. You can walk right up to him and stroke his feathers. He watches over the girls and brings them tasty bugs to eat. I don't know if that has anything to do with me picking him up some much when he was a chick but that's what I like to attribute his good nature to. [​IMG]
     
  5. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Play with them and handle them just like the rest. There are roosters who are ignored and rosters who are doted on that can be equally protective or down right nasty. I think it's 99% the bird.
     
  6. jessierose

    jessierose Out Of The Brooder

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    My roos have all been sweethearts. I handled them alot from very early on, gave them treats while they sat on my shoulders, and carried them around when I did little yard jobs.
    I know people have had cuddled roos turn out mean but I have loved on mean birds til they chilled out. It may be hit or miss, I don't know.
     
  7. chookchick

    chookchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Like Silkie chicken says--it's mostly the rooster. I don't think you can take a rooster with a predisposition to be nasty, and make him a sweet little lapdog. If the rooster is very borderline aggressive--you may be able to keep the upper hand with "training". Good news is--it is a lot easier to part with them when they get nasty. Wait and see how the personalities turn out before you decide.
     
  8. The Sheriff

    The Sheriff Overrun With Chickens

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    Can you keep them all till you figure out who has the best personality?
     
  9. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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    Quote:Yes. However, I would prefer to keep the Welsummer, but if it turns mean, it's gonzo. (the other 2 are BR)
     
  10. The Chickens' Maid

    The Chickens' Maid Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, I've found that with roosters you have to discipline them early. When they peck or try to attack you, they are testing their boundaries and you have to let them know where those boundaries are. It's hard to do with a really young cockerel, like, say, four months old or so. At that age, I've found that they are still baby enough to not really understand a lot of hard "rooster" discipline. Once they start to mature, though, they will test their limits a lot. It may just be breeding, but I've used this same method with our BO rooster, who is an angel, and his three sons. We have an enclosed run for our flock, and every time one of the cockerels pecks me or runs at me, I'll grab them and let them have a time-out outside. This doesn't really work very well in the daytime unless you can sit at the run/coop door for hours on end, but it works very well at night. It send the message that this is YOUR coop not HIS. After a while, they start to get the idea. However, they will still be roosters; our BO will still run at strangers or people who are afraid of him. He is protecting his hens, so I let it go as long as he doesn't hurt anyone or do that to me.
    Also, love him up a lot. If he gets the idea that you are safety, then, once he's been put in his place, he may even want you to pick him up, hold him, cuddle him, baby him, hide him in your coat when it's cold . . . [​IMG]
     

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