To cull or not to cull...HELP!!

Discussion in 'Geese' started by IGmom, Aug 21, 2014.

  1. IGmom

    IGmom Out Of The Brooder

    79
    1
    41
    Mar 4, 2012
    Bixby, Ok.
    We have a pair of geese and the male is the typical aggressive goose(gander?) Anyway, I have had them since a week of age. He is getting increasingly aggressive and I am sure by the time next spring and breeding season arrives I wont be able to go in there at all. He recently pecked all the back feathers off my mallard female that I had rescued during the night while they were enclosed. He goes after anything and everyone that walks by the pen. I am thinking of doing away with him as I cannot find him another home. Any thoughts from those more experienced? I have read views on this site of people that cull the problem one. The female is pretty docile.
    I need to make a decision in the next day or so.
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

    4,905
    588
    286
    Apr 8, 2013
    Australia
    Cull, is my recommendation. You cannot have your safety compromised by him to the point where if the female or future offspring need help, you cannot get near them to help.

    He'll likely pass on that violent nature too, as well as teach it to the goslings. Better to cull sooner than later so they don't breed first and so she can bond to a better gander just in time to breed.

    I've had both nasty ganders and nice ones, and they're like night and day --- same with roosters, rams, billies, toms, whatever --- it's a fallacy that male animals are automatically violent, there are many good ones out there.

    Some people here train ganders out of aggression, or say they have, might be worth checking that out, but I doubt you'll achieve anythings significant before breeding season arrives and to be honest I wouldn't bother with him unless he had some kind of fantastical genetics. For every vicious animal people keep, good animals die for want of a home.

    Best wishes.
     
  3. servpolice

    servpolice Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

    3,346
    113
    196
    Oct 10, 2013
    Ireland
    If the gander. runs at you then run back at him and if he is not scared and dosent. move give him a good kick until he runs away and if he bites you kick him harder(it won't injure the gander by kicking him hard especially because when ganders fight then smack eachother harder then a hard kick) and do it everytime he charges you kick :)
    I did this with my African cross and he learnt his lesson after 2 weeks :)
     
  4. The goose girl

    The goose girl Chillin' With My Peeps

    789
    78
    171
    Jul 7, 2010
    Denmark
    I'd also recommend culling.

    Kicking seems a risky solution. Depending on how you interpret "a good kick" and "kick him harder", on your footwear, and on where a kick lands on his body, you could injure him quite badly. Ganders can indeed seriously hurt and occasionally even kill each other - Konrad Lorenz describes this in his book "The Year of the Greylag Goose".

    I have to say that I don't like the idea of kicking any animal as a mean of controlling them. Also, even if the kicking works, i.e. the gander stays away from you, he'd still attack everything else.

    If you decide to cull him, bear in mind that your female goose will then feel much more unsafe and maybe turn less docile than now. Geese need company to thrive.
     
    2 people like this.
  5. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

    4,905
    588
    286
    Apr 8, 2013
    Australia
    I thought to suggest before that perhaps she should have another goose added, maybe a female, for company before the male is culled, but then I thought of potential trio incompatibility when another male is added, i.e. the 'odd goose out syndrome' if the extra female is not accepted by the alpha pair. There's no guarantee the original goose wouldn't end up the odd one out, either. Can be next to impossible to say how to keep things socially peaceable.

    Best wishes.
     
  6. livininbrazil

    livininbrazil Chillin' With My Peeps

    What breed is it? Are the two actual paired off, as a couple?
    Any chance of getting a young gander that´s from this year to put with her? But separate the older gander so he can´t do it any harm, but within sight of the others though so it doesn´t stress too much. See if the goose is ok with the youngster. Maybe a couple of days. She should be with it, after a bit. Then the older gander disappears....
    And try to get a gander that´s from one of the milder breeds, like Buff, Pilgrim or Sebastopol.
    Do you actually want to breed them? If you only want eggs, then you could get another female and do the same as above....
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2014
  7. IGmom

    IGmom Out Of The Brooder

    79
    1
    41
    Mar 4, 2012
    Bixby, Ok.
    I think it is African but some say Chinese. Yes they are a pair. What I want to do is get another female but no one is wanting the Gander. He isn't horrible to me but has been really nasty to me at times. I take care of that but he is super nasty to anyone BUT me and is nasty to a little duck we rescued. At present I have no where to put the gander, cant put him with the chickens as he pulls their feathers out and torments them. We have plenty of acreage but it isn't fenced for geese.
     
  8. IGmom

    IGmom Out Of The Brooder

    79
    1
    41
    Mar 4, 2012
    Bixby, Ok.
    thanks first of all for replying. it is nice to know I am not alone and there are others who have experience to help. I don't kick him, I push him or hold him down for a few seconds. it doesn't last long though and if you turn your back you better watch out.
    the goose is with a young mallard we rescued would that be sufficient company? or I can get more ducks or female geese. ideally i'd like to find someone who wants a breeding pair.
     
  9. livininbrazil

    livininbrazil Chillin' With My Peeps

    So do you want to sell them, then?
     
  10. IGmom

    IGmom Out Of The Brooder

    79
    1
    41
    Mar 4, 2012
    Bixby, Ok.
    sell or give away to a good home where they wont b eaten.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by