To cull or not to cull...

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Breezy_Living, Dec 17, 2011.

  1. Breezy_Living

    Breezy_Living Out Of The Brooder

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    Northern California
    My rooster has always been pretty docile, compared to what I have read they CAN be like, but even so I am torn has to whether or not he'd be worth keeping around.

    A little history is that this is my first flock of 4 and 1I ended up being a BR too. I didn't know she was a he until they were about 3-4 months so I figured I would keep him. I tried all the tips and tricks to make sure he knew I am the Alpha, and occasionally he will try to make a jump at me (never back turned though, luckily). He doesn't like to be touched much even by the hens and those accidental moments are the only times he tried to get the upper hand, and I always responded accordingly.

    But my 4-year-old son is a little more his size. He doesn't attack him around the hens but he will attack if my son gets too close to him, even by accident. (Son is a little fearful of him now, so doesn't try to approach him on purpose).
    today was an attack day, even if it was a tiny scratch, what if next time my son leans down and he attacks hits face? I caught him after this incident and put him in the dog kennel -- "solitary confinement" -- until further notice.

    While he would make a delicious Christmas roast (free range birds at the market are like $20-25!! Lol) but part off me feels like he's not extremely aggressive -- more like a personal space issue -- so I should keep him around.

    WWYD?
     
  2. CarolJ

    CarolJ Dogwood Trace Farm

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    You'll get different answers. I haven't had to cull one of my chickens yet - although I'm sure the day is coming when I'll have to. I would definitely put my child's safety ahead of keeping the rooster, though. Either sell him or give him away or cull.
     
  3. Breezy_Living

    Breezy_Living Out Of The Brooder

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    May 19, 2011
    Northern California
    Sorry about the grammar/spelling, my phone likes to change things on me at times. ;-)
     
  4. peterlund

    peterlund Chillin' With My Peeps

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    MA Cranberry Country
    If you want fertile eggs for hatching then keep him... Otherwise give him away to someones stew pot or harvest him for yourself.
     
  5. Ariel301

    Ariel301 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 14, 2009
    Kingman Arizona
    There are enough well-mannered roosters in the world that there is no point in keeping one that is aggressive. If he has learned to take advantage of a child, he will probably get more brave and try to take on someone bigger. In my opinion, it's not worth the trouble. Roast him, and if you want a rooster, find one that has a track record of being tolerant of children.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2011
  6. jeslewmazer

    jeslewmazer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 24, 2009
    Mississippi
    In my personal opinion. I would not keep or breed him. If you have not succeeded on "taming" him, then he might not ever be. From my experience a man fighter can pass it along to his offspring and they might be man fighters too. And like Ariel301 said
    There are enough well-mannered roosters in the world that there is no point in keeping one that is aggressive.

    If the rooster is unprovoked by the child, I would find other placement for him. I don't have any kids of my own. I do have a nephew and nieces and other small children that love my chickens and like to pet them all. I try to make sure the kids don't provoke. For example: chasing the chickens, which to some might appear to be harmless, but really it is not. A good rooster will protect his hens (even with his life), but mine know that my husband and me are the Alphas. I had a bad experience with a RIR when I was younger. It started out small, then my younger sister and me had to walk around the yard with a stick. Later the stick did not scare him and he jumped on my sisters back. My mom was not having that, so he became dog food. I have yet to own another RIR rooster, but I like the hens. [​IMG] [​IMG] So, do what you will, but I don't think a child should be scared of a chicken. That's what I was taught anyways. [​IMG]
     
  7. tinychicky

    tinychicky Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 24, 2010
    Hollis, New Hampshire
    Quote:there's your mistake right there. with many animals it's true that that's the best thing to do, but with chickens, not so much. you've seen how chickens interact with each other; roosters always challange leadership, no matter what, and yet love thier adoring hens. i know it's not a very widely spread belief, but i think you'll get along much better with you rooster if he thinks he's the boss and he has your respect. since i started with that practice i've never had an issue with a mean rooster. i've even been able to turn the mean ones around!

    so my advice is, give him a chance. try picking him up ad gently rubbing or 'pecking' his face like hens do, only never above his eye, and always let him down as soon as he struggles. he must know you respect him. i know it sounds a little strange but i have roosters who will follow me all over the place and call me over to food, and warn me of predators whether there are other chickens around or not. it really works, you might as well try it [​IMG]
     
  8. GARYZZ1

    GARYZZ1 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 15, 2011
    Quote:OFF HIM NOW,IT WILL ONLY GET WORSE...IT`S A CHICKEN,YOUR SON WILL REMEMBER THIS HIS WHOLE LIFE ! SORRY TO BE SO HARSH BUT I JUST WENT THROUGH THIS WITH MY GIRLS AND KNOW WE CAN GO BACK IN TO THE COOP WITH NO WORRIES...
     
  9. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    On the MN prairie.
    But my 4-year-old son is a little more his size. He doesn't attack him around the hens but he will attack if my son gets too close to him, even by accident. (Son is a little fearful of him now, so doesn't try to approach him on purpose).
    today was an attack day, even if it was a tiny scratch, what if next time my son leans down and he attacks hits face? I caught him after this incident and put him in the dog kennel -- "solitary confinement" -- until further notice.

    While he would make a delicious Christmas roast (free range birds at the market are like $20-25!! Lol) but part off me feels like he's not extremely aggressive -- more like a personal space issue -- so I should keep him around.

    WWYD?

    How aggressive does he need to be before you decide for sure? When he scars your son's face? When your son is too afraid to even go outside? When he turns on you? I'd get rid of him immediately. If you want fertile eggs, get a nice roo. They can be found. I don't know if it's a breed trait or not, but the only BR roo we had here was very aggressive. He went away.​
     
  10. Patricia Jane

    Patricia Jane Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Petaluma CA
    Rehome him. I myself could not cull any of my animals but I certainly wouldn't keep an agressive animal of any kind especially when children are involved.
     

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