To drafty?

CatsvsDogs

In the Brooder
9 Years
Jan 26, 2010
36
0
22
NW Washington
I am using some of the suntuff corrugated roofing for my coop. They make a closure strip that can be installed on the the ends of your panels at the eaves which I do not have. Is this going to be to drafty. Or will this be all I need for my ventilation? I don't have it screened off either which may be a problem?


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I just put up the ridge cap not sure I like it, Opinions?
 
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patandchickens

Flock Mistress
12 Years
Apr 20, 2007
12,520
338
341
Ontario, Canada
I hate to say it but you have your suntuf installed incorrectly -- although because this is a tiny coop and the only exposed fasteners are over the wall, it will probably not be a big problem and at this point prolly best to just live with it. But what's meant to be done is to use the closure strip (it is NOT OPTIONAL, you HAVE TO use it to install the stuff right!) and then screw thru it through the *ribs*, not the valleys.

The problem with screwing through the valleys is that your roof will begin to leak over time. Although if you have also not followed the instruction about drilling the holes slightly too-large (which is ok in your case b/c the roof is very short, but would cause damage to the roofing over the next year if you had a normal size roof), and the holes are only "just" big enough for the screws, this may not be a major problem and in any case it's over a wall. If it were me I would just keep an eye on it as the years pass, to check for deterioration, but leave it be.

(You *have* used gasketed screws, yes?)

So, really the closure strip is not a choice, it is necessary to be able to screw through the ribs (which is necessary b/c of the oversized holes needed to accomodate the thermal movement of the panels)... but in your case, I would say it is probably reasonable to leave it off at this point. If you should decide you need to close it off in the winter you can retrofit something pretty easily, but realistically unless you are in a very windy site *and* NW Washington State gets colder than I am thinking it does, you may well be ok.

A more aesthetically-pleasing ridge cap could be made by one of two methods: you could get another piece of suntuf, cut an appropriate size piece (length of ridge x a foot or so wide) and bend it over and screw it on over the ridge, so the ribs run parallel to the ridge; or (my preference) get some L-shaped aluminum valley flashing and screw that on over the ridge. I would use the filler strips between ridge cap and suntuf to prevent wind/rain from blowing up under the ridge cap into the seam atop the roof, though.

Good luck, have fun,

Pat
 

CatsvsDogs

In the Brooder
9 Years
Jan 26, 2010
36
0
22
NW Washington
Thanks Pat you are so right about where I installed the fasteners, I should know better. I did use EPDM washered fastners. I did not know I was supposed to pre-drill the holes. I have removed the ridge cap and will then turn over the material so my hole will then be on the ridge. That way I can get the closure strip in there as well.

So about the ventilation, I have six 2" metal round louvered vents to go in the soffit and two 4" round to go in the gable ends. I am not sure if that is adequate or not. I have read Pat's vent page but I am still not sure on amount of vent to sq feet of structure. Interior is 11 sq feet. Also by putting the 4" vents up in the gable is that going to be to drafty for when they are sitting on their roosts. I am looking of putting just two hens in this coop.
 

turbodog

Songster
9 Years
Feb 21, 2010
537
12
131
Independence, La.
Quote:
If the valley spaces under the ridge cap are sealed with filler strips, heat won't be able to vent out of the highest space in the roof. (which is where any heat will naturally rise to right?
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) Since the present ridge cap isn't very wide I can see the worry about rain being blown in though.

A wider ridge cap (like the kind sold for metal roofs) would probably work fine and look nice too. Should be no need for filler strips then and heat can vent easily.

I would think you can't really go wrong with your plans for ventilation. If it proves too much you can always block some off later.

Very nice little coop you've built!
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patandchickens

Flock Mistress
12 Years
Apr 20, 2007
12,520
338
341
Ontario, Canada
Quote:
No, wait, you can't do that... only one side is meant to be exposed to UV. (the side that had the sticker on it along the edge). I do not know how *much* of a difference it makes, but since they are so insistant in their instructions that you need to have the stickered side facing out, I assume it makes some real difference.

Honestly if you did not overdrill your holes (which would be Bad for a large roof but probably OK for this one... if you are worried, go back and overdrill the ones along the ridge, so THAT end can move, and I guarantee you will be ok) then I think you are pretty ok staying with the washered screws in the valleys.

So about the ventilation, I have six 2" metal round louvered vents to go in the soffit and two 4" round to go in the gable ends. I am not sure if that is adequate or not. I have read Pat's vent page but I am still not sure on amount of vent to sq feet of structure. Interior is 11 sq feet. Also by putting the 4" vents up in the gable is that going to be to drafty for when they are sitting on their roosts. I am looking of putting just two hens in this coop.

Small coops *are* hard to ventilate adequately without drafts. Putting only 2 hens in there makes it easier for you, by reducing the moisture load. I would suggest putting the roost as close as possible to one gable end, and planning the vents you will use in wintertime to go in the opposite gable end. I loathe those little round vents because they are too dang TINY for a coop, but that said, if you will only ever have 2 chickens in there and will be very careful with sanitation and waterer spills, that *might* be enough ventilation. Maybe. Personally I would build more though, esp. at the top of the gable end opposite the roost. Like maybe, cut a large square or triangular hole and hardware-cloth it, with a flap or slider to close it down as much as desired. Remember that you will probably have to close the soffit vents (at least those near the roost) on cold nights.

Good luck, have fun,

Pat​
 

LynneP

Songster
11 Years
Mar 21, 2008
4,746
66
231
Centre Rawdon, Nova Scotia, Canada
Just another thought on the closure strips, which I know you are installing- these strips are also useful to keep small predators out, especially weasels which can squeeze through any opening greater than 1/2". So it's worth the effort to get this right.
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Also, even with a small number of hens, you could roof the run with one extra panel, preventing all the water from dripping in front, it would be a godsend, considering how wet it gets where you live!
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CatsvsDogs

In the Brooder
9 Years
Jan 26, 2010
36
0
22
NW Washington
UGH. Now my wife says the roof just doesn't look right. I was using this type of material because of the lightness of it. I am thinking now of just sheeting roof and laying laminate shingles which I already have on hand.
 

gsim

Songster
10 Years
Jun 18, 2009
1,997
41
196
East Tennessee
Quote:
From what I see, you need to make more ventilation. I would look into installing a pair of 12 x 12 louvered vents at the tops of the gables, as high up as is possible. Or, do a ventilated cupola at the center of the roof's peak. As it is, you do not have near enough ventilation. Always best to have the permanent ventilation up high as possible so that there are no drafts at the roost during wintertime. In summer weather, best to have a drafty coop at all times, day and night. But ventilation if vital at all times. Without it your birds can suffer lung ailments and are more susceptible to frostbite due to humidity.
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