To heat or not to heat

tree48

Hatching
7 Years
Mar 20, 2012
7
0
7
I have 6 chickens. Do I need to heat the coop with a lamp. I am heating it now. It is going to be 29 degrees tonight. How else could I heat the coop.
 

Fred's Hens

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
You'll get all kinds of responses. Some do try to heat, but the majority of folks don't heat their coops. You're free to spin the electric meter, as the Power Company will love you!
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mickey328

Songster
7 Years
May 4, 2012
1,380
94
168
Northern Colorado
Let me be the second to weigh in...as long as their coop is well ventilated but the wind doesn't blow directly on the birds, it's unlikely you'll need to heat. They generate a lot of heat and down is very good insulation :)
 

longlegz86

Chirping
7 Years
Oct 23, 2012
234
8
83
Rutherfordton NC
Thanks for asking this because I was wondering the same thing with mine. I have panels of some of the walls to block wind but wasnt sure if it was good enough..... I just want them to live and not die. If someone could look at my pictures and let me know if its ok to not use heat, id appreciate it.
 

ChickensAreSweet

Heavenly Grains for Hens
9 Years
Jun 8, 2010
15,100
700
398
Pacific NW- where the Douglas Firs grow
It depends on the breeds you have, and what kind of coop.

If you have seramas I have heard they require some warmth.

Some breeds, like my tiny bantams, really benefit from an insulated coop. In the microclimate where my coops are, I would question their ability to survive without a light bulb when it gets down to our coldest point if they weren't in an insulated coop. This is because of the dampness of our winters.

If you can keep your coop nice and dry, and draft-free, then you are good to go! There should still be ventilation (like windows up high) but you don't want the wind blowing on the chickens as they roost.

I have my large fowl in a metal shed, and only will be giving them a light for warmth when we get down to 10-20 degrees, because it is ridiculously damp here. The dampness permeates the coop and everything in it. I even get mold in my coops and have to bleach them out in the winter.

My tiny bantams will be getting a 100 watt bulb in their insulated coop when it gets down to around 30 and below. Which is kind of a short-lived thing here where I live. We usually are in the 40s and 50s during the winter, with LOTS of rain!

So it is somewhat of a shock to my chickens to all of a sudden have to deal with that cold snap we always get for a few weeks each year, down to 20s and even 10s.

IF I lived somewhere where I could keep a nice dry coop and it was cold all the time, I would not even worry if I had large fowl unless it got amazingly cold.
 
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tree48

Hatching
7 Years
Mar 20, 2012
7
0
7
Thanks it is cold n dry here. The person I got the chickens from heated the coop. I am going to build a new insulated coop next summer with a heated floor. It is going to be a five star coop
 

grammym

In the Brooder
7 Years
Oct 22, 2012
35
2
34
Sequim, WA
chickens are sweet - where are you located? I'm in Sequim between Port Townsend and Port Angeles. Are you anywhere near here?
 

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