to much drainage

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by bugkiller, Oct 2, 2016.

  1. bugkiller

    bugkiller Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 24, 2011
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    Ok I have had a serious drainage problem in my soil as in way too much. it is fairly sandy soil. I have been adding organic matter over past 2 yrs but long way to go. it rained for 2 days straight here and I went and turned the soil over and 3 inches down it was bone dry. what can I do to improve this.
     
  2. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    How long after the rain did you turn the dirt?
     
  3. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    I also have sandy soil. I would think adding a clay type dirt material maybe might work. But things like mulch are good at drainage and can hold the moisture in. Straw for example.

    Maybe fill dirt from a soil yard will work.
     
  4. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    I recommend that you look into Back to Eden gardening.

    This style of gardening is good for clay soils. Good for sandy soils. Good for wet soils. Good for dry soils. Are you doing a permanent mulch in your garden? That's a good place to start.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2016
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  5. Goosegrrl

    Goosegrrl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In florida our 'soil' is often not much more than pure sand with a bit of black organic matter dust in it. The absolute best that you can do for it is apply obscene amounts of organic matter such as leaves, mulch(I like to take peoples old faded half rotten mulch when I can get it because they are putting down new), straw, and the detritius from nearly rotten wood/logs. I add hot fresh manure to this to help it start composting, and offset the nitrogen deffiency.
    Beware of applying any sort of clay to very sandy soil... It basically mixed and forms something near to concrete.
    If you have added a TON of organic matter, and the sand ratio is well decreased, then adding a limited amount of clay(I have used plain, old fashioned, unscented cat litter) can be safely added.
     
  6. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    An other option for very sandy, arid areas would be Hugelkulture. Not appropriate for every site. But, in limited application, where space allows, and if one has the equipment or back bone to create a HK bed, that might be your best option.
     
  7. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    I didn't know that.

    Thanks.
     
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  8. bugkiller

    bugkiller Chillin' With My Peeps

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    it was not more than 2 hrs and I mean it was bone dry
     
  9. Goosegrrl

    Goosegrrl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    On the upside, at least the organic matter you add up north will last a while for you.
    Down here with the constant heat and rain it is a constant battle to keep up with adding more because the microbial activity just burns right through it. It does wonders here if you can keep up with adding the layers on constantly though.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2016
  10. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    What about putting a berm around the garden to direct water into it???
     

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