To Roo or Not to Roo

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by RedDrgn, Jul 28, 2011.

  1. RedDrgn

    RedDrgn Anachronistic Anomaly

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    May 11, 2011
    West Virginia
    My Coop
    My DH and I have our first five chickens, 3 weeks old now, and purchased as day old (they all are supposed be and so far appear to be pullets). While our coop and run (fully enclosed) will easily handle 8-10 chickens, we have no intention of succumbing to chicken math any time soon; we want to make sure we really get a good handle on this raising chickens thing, first. [​IMG]

    So while we may add to our flock a little down the road, we definitely don't have plans for hatching our own eggs or have any use for fertile eggs. We're just doing this for the sake of interest, the fact that we love all sorts of animals, and to have the satisfaction of getting our own eggs. While I am in no way opposed to eating chicken, I am pretty certain that I could not process and eat our chickens (or any chicken we ever have)...I am already waaaaay to attached. [​IMG]

    So all of that said, roos intrigue me....a lot. I have very little personal experience with any roos, though. I know they can range from attack-demons-from-hell to sweet-gentle-mcflufferkins, and absolutely anywhere in between. Our run is secure enough that we have no need of a rooster for protection (and know that they don't afford all that much, anyway). Our chickens will also never be out of their run without my DH or I out in the yard with them. I know they make a ton of noise, but that is not a problem where we live (and I already had one neighbor ask me why we didn't have a rooster [​IMG]).

    When I bring up potentially getting a roo, my DH smiles and rolls his eyes and doesn't commit either way. [​IMG] And while I have no intention of acquiring a roo any time soon, there is something in the back of my mind that wants to at some point. Is that a notion that I would be better off squashing right now, or something that isn't an absolutely terrible idea based on everything else I mentioned?
     
  2. heather112588

    heather112588 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Baltimore, MD
    In my opinion, alot of other factors play into whether you truely want a roo such as:

    -how close your neighbors are and how they would react to crowing at all hours
    -how you could handle crowing (frankly it doesn't bother me but im weird)
    - how many girls you want to keep (they need at least 5- any less and he will pay them too much attention/bare back them)

    - do you have a breed in mind (certain breeds are more docile) or do you have time to work with one?... I had to handle mine everyday for him to be mellow (as you have probably seen on here, most are not mellow)

    but for all of that, there are good traits too:
    -fertilized eggs, if you wish to raise chicks
    - extra protection
    - comedy (they have a personality all their own, secretly in love with themselves)


    --> Personally, I never intended to get a roo but one of our girls turned out to be a roo. He has brought us such joy and has never flogged anyone of us (hes 1 1/2 yr old). He has fought for the girls on more than one occasion (we have bad predator problems and he has definently done a great job). Having a tame one, I couldn't be without one now.
     
  3. christineavatar

    christineavatar Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 1, 2011
    Bolinas, CA
    I'm with Heather. I also didn't plan on getting a rooster but one of my chicks turned out male. He was such a good 'hubby' to the girls. One night a raccoon got into the hen house and he fought it. The noise he made woke me up and I joined the fight. The raccoon got away and the rooster died the next day of his injuries but he saved the flock. I have gotten a second rooster to replace him. The old girls are already treating him like the 'man of the coop'. It just is more balanced and good for the birds, I think.
     
  4. christineavatar

    christineavatar Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Bolinas, CA
    I almost forgot. If you do get a rooster remember - treat him like a rooster. If you befriend him as a chick he gets downright surly as an adult. Perhaps when (if) you get the rest of your flock, you could include a male in the scheme of things.
     
  5. RedDrgn

    RedDrgn Anachronistic Anomaly

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    May 11, 2011
    West Virginia
    My Coop
    Quote:Our closest neighbor is about 100 feet away, and that's the neighbor that asked why we DIDN'T have a roo already. Of our other three neighbors: one already said they wouldn't mind, another has two very loud dogs that bark all of the time anyway, and the third I would be glad to irritate if I could since they like to get drunk and blast their radio while cussing each other out all night. [​IMG]

    The crowing won't bother me - I grew up with parrots, so I'm really good at blocking out bird noises. Not sure about my husband...he's very noncommittal about the subject so far. XD

    Not planning on ever letting our flock drop below five hens, so that seems like a favorable thing. I haven't considering breeds yet because it's still a distant future potential if a potential at all.

    Hmmm....

    Quote:Now there's something I had no idea about. Thanks for that bit of advice!
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2011
  6. homesteadinmama

    homesteadinmama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I ordered pullets for my first time, hoping that I would get a rooster. However all my girls were girls so I found a roo for them, same age and he is their protector. He does crow but no complaints yet, we do have homes nearby. I wanted a roo, just for the chance of someday having a gal go broody and hatching out some chicks. But for now we just eat the eggs. I have a slw roo, none are super friendly, but he does eat treats out of your hand and will let you pet/hold him. Good luck, I say get a roo!
     

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