To worm or not to worm?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chickflick, Feb 4, 2008.

  1. chickflick

    chickflick Overrun With Chickens

    4,477
    100
    291
    Mar 10, 2007
    Dimondale
    Is it necessary to worm chickens when they have no worms yet? Do you do it as a prevenitive or do you wait until you see worms? I hate putting chemicals in them when it's not necessary. So, all you experts, can I have some opinions on this. My egg production is down , so now would be a good time to do it. But, do I need to? Thanks for your help.[​IMG]
     
  2. airmom1c05

    airmom1c05 Chillin' With My Peeps

    954
    1
    151
    Feb 3, 2008
    Raymond, Mississippi
    Hi! My vet says not to worm without a stool sample because there are many kinds of worms a chicken can have and all treatments out there don't treat every worm.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2008
  3. chickflick

    chickflick Overrun With Chickens

    4,477
    100
    291
    Mar 10, 2007
    Dimondale
    Thanks for the reply. That makes a whole lot of sense. I know a lot of people do it as a preventive, but I hate giving meds when not needed.
     
  4. hcammack

    hcammack Overrun With Chickens

    8,976
    36
    303
    Oct 5, 2007
    Vermont
    I have decided not to worm my new birds that I am adding to the flock I am just ordering DE I have wazin handy if I need it. choped Pumpkin seeds in Buttermilk and somtimes act as a small load natural wormer and I will be using it soon. Somthing in the pumpkin paralizes the worm I think.

    Good luck
    Henry
     
  5. xitaa

    xitaa Out Of The Brooder

    49
    0
    32
    May 18, 2007
    What is the chopped pumpkin seeds in buttermilk formula? Sounds like something this family would like to try.
     
  6. hcammack

    hcammack Overrun With Chickens

    8,976
    36
    303
    Oct 5, 2007
    Vermont
    It is just that chopped pumpkin seeds and buttermilk fed the the chickens and something in the pumpkin seeds paralize the worms. ask Speckeled hen about it. It only works on small worm loads so if you know it is a problem you should probably get a good wormer. It is more of a preventative mesure.

    Good Luck
    Henry
     
  7. sammi

    sammi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 21, 2007
    Southeast USA
    I have read on another forum that cayenne pepper sprinkled in feed can act as a preventative, and even help get rid of worms.

    the Wazine (piperazine) only gets rid of adult round worms. (which are common in chickens.)
    for other worms, you'd need a broader wormer, such as Eprinex/ivermectin. (which worms AND de-bugs)

    best to take a fecal sample to vet to test for worms and protozoa (cocci).
     
  8. Yogiman

    Yogiman Chillin' With My Peeps

    679
    0
    149
    Feb 2, 2008
    South Louisiana
    I have the same situation with my free range hens. I am led to believe through research that all free range poultry does or will have worms.

    I searced long and hard for a wormer. I came across a product called "Rooster Booster" which I ordered along with some of their supplements. I found it at this link:
    http://www.roosterboosterproducts.com/site/681439/page/45031

    It is a general purpose pellet form that mixes with the laying pellets. Also you do not have to dispose of the eggs. It is advertised as "the only poultry wormer approved by the FDA" for what ever that is worth.

    Question: Does anyone else on the forum use this product and what was the results?

    I have not done a stool sample with my vet. Not real sure if either of them has ever seen a live chicken. lol Just cats and dogs.

    I would very much appreciate any input and or reviews of this product.
     
  9. sammi

    sammi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 21, 2007
    Southeast USA
    a vet doesn't have to see the chicken for a fecal test..

    just a fecal sample.

    yes..free range chickens will have worms..but heavy infestation isn't healthy and interferes with nutrition absorption, and eventually will compromise the health of the birds, cause less egg production, soft shelled eggs, lower immune system.
     
  10. bigzio

    bigzio Overrun With Chickens

    4,603
    117
    291
    Jan 20, 2007
    Wisconsin
    My flock has me keeping a close eye on them. They free range during the summer months and get alot of healthy treats. They all have bright combs, eat well, lay well, appear healthy to me, so I see no need to worm.
    I think if one wants to worm the flock, it would be best to wait til the molt. Worming then would be when the flock isn't laying and then no eggs are wasted, and time for recovery from the meds would work best.

    bigzio
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by