1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Tobacco Barn Coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by scrimshaw, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. scrimshaw

    scrimshaw New Egg

    4
    0
    7
    Feb 15, 2012
    New to the forum, thanks for having me. I've always dreamed of restoring a tobacco barn since my youth, and put the word out recently locally. I was able to come up with 4 tobacco barns that I'm in the process of numbering and disassembling. Two have already been relocated to my property.

    The barns are 50-100 years old and are hand hewn pine and oak timber. Beautiful structures. I plan on restoring them as they were when new. Two of the barns have some rot and I'll have to use the wood for furniture or perhaps for rafters and beams for possibly putting a second floor in or loft.

    I have the choice of two spots. I have a hill that's SE facing and I can either put the barns at the top of the hill or at the base of the hill (putting at the base of the hill puts them closer to my house and higher puts them at a higher elevation with perhaps not as much runoff and perhaps allowing the birds to see danger more quickly).

    The other two barns are in perfect condition and these will be the real stars. Each is 18' x 18' wide and about 18' tall. There's plenty of room for a second floor. Alternatively, I could make a combination of structures that are about 9' tall excluding the pitched roof and end up with 4 nice structures as opposed to just two. Tough decisions...can't decide whether more is better or to reconstruct the buildings as they were, as tobacco barns, to preserve their historical significance, since they are in such good shape. Even the tier polls, for those of you that know what those are, are in excellent condition and would make great perches for the birds.

    So, looking for a little guidance on placement and design. They are basically squares. Was going to use one of the barns as a work shop and one for chickens. I also might divide one or both or perhaps find more barns to serve as living quarters for some goats and perhaps a cow and horse.

    Most tobacco barns have "lean-to's" attached to them. My original thought was to put a lean to on 3 sides and use those lean to's to attach chainlink dog fence's to, so that the chickens would have about 600 sq ft of a chicken run. I will also let them free range in this area when I'm around. I'll have the whole 4 acre hill side fenced in for my goats (haven't gotten yet, but wanted to start with the chicken).

    I welcome all ideas...perhaps I don't need a chicken run, or perhaps it's too big. I plan on having a lot of varieties over time. Have 100 acres so space isn't an issue.

    I'm a big trapper and have already trapped about 30 raccoons and 20 possums from the property. I will definitely screen for predators heavily. I will likely be using a dry stack stone foundation from the existing foundations of the barns since the rock is available to me. I know I'll have to bury some hardware cloth or wire into the ground at least 18 inches either on the outside or inside of the foundation. I'll probably raise the first sill plate log about 18 inches off the ground to help avoid rot and moisture.

    Both the locations either the bottom of the hill or top are accessible for power and water to be ran so that's no an issue for either spot either.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2012
  2. scrimshaw

    scrimshaw New Egg

    4
    0
    7
    Feb 15, 2012
    Here are some pictures of one of the barns. A lot of this wood is hand hewn oak. Below are some more shots of the barn wood including the hand hewn marks on the wood made with an ax and the timber diassembled before being loaded. You might be able to make out the small pieces of aluminum flashing I used and nailed to the ends to mark the posts with my own system of numbering by using a permanent marker on the pieces of flashing.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. scrimshaw

    scrimshaw New Egg

    4
    0
    7
    Feb 15, 2012
    A few more pictures of one of the barns...
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Chic-n-farmer

    Chic-n-farmer Showers of Blessings

    Thank you for taking on such a project. It would be a shame for those pieces of history to crumble away. [​IMG]
     
  5. scrimshaw

    scrimshaw New Egg

    4
    0
    7
    Feb 15, 2012
    Making progress on the tobacco barn chicken coop. The original barns had a lot of rot in them so I had to shorten the logs to 13' on one end and 10' on the other. I'm going up about 10' to give plenty of head room and will make an A frame roof also to add roosting area. Got 12 chicks today of three varieties: NH Reds, Orphie's and Australops. I still have a lot of work to do on the chicken coop: Stack some more logs, put on a roof, chink the logs, dry stack more stone at the foundation and secure with wire for predators as well as construct a run. I guess I've got about 4-5 weeks before the chickens can depart my garage and head to the coop so I better hurry!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by