Today was the first one ever!

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by zowieyellowflame, Nov 1, 2009.

  1. zowieyellowflame

    zowieyellowflame Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 11, 2009
    Nova Scotia
    We have separated our roos weeks ago but missed one, he has been in with the girls and the 1 big roo and causing havoc. (i think he even injured my little wry neck hen that I am nursing in the basement, "Rye")
    So today was his day. My husband got him, stuck his head through a hole in a feed bag, and chopped his head off with a clever. I watched from a distance. It was extremely quick, no delay at all. The bag kept the body from flopping all over. We scalded him, took out most of the feathers, cleaned him and now he is in the fridge.
    This has been a day that I have dreaded for months and it was not that bad at all. After his head was chopped, it became very easy.
    Anyways, there is not a lot of meat on him at all. He was born in June and has been running around a lot, chasing the girls.
    Any cooking suggestions?
     
  2. Scoop

    Scoop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 16, 2009
    Central PA
    Use a pressure cooker if you have one. The meat won't be tough then. Now you've got me thinking that's what I should have for dinner today. I have 2 small roos to use up and they are small with little meat, too. I usually make chicken and dumplings in the pressure cooker. The only thing that is a pain are the bones.
     
  3. zowieyellowflame

    zowieyellowflame Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 11, 2009
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    Do you expect that a young roo would be tough? are all roos tough?
    I don't have a pressure cooker. I was going to brine it and then roast?
     
  4. Scoop

    Scoop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 16, 2009
    Central PA
    Your plan sounds okay! My experience is that the meaties are usually not tough but the non-meaties are. Brining it would probably help. Maybe others could tell you about that since I haven't done that yet.
     
  5. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

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    I'm glad things went so well with your first processing session. Be sure to let this guy "rest" in the refrigerator for 1-3 days before cooking him. That will insure that his meat won't be tough or chewy. Then you could roast him, covered, on low heat with some moisture in the pan, some broth or veggies or both. Or you could simmer him slowly, on the stove top or in a crock pot, in herbed water. I do this with my birds until their meat melts off their bones. Then I pick the meat & use it in soups, stews, salads, & chili dishes so its goodness goes farther.
    [​IMG] Enjoy!
     
  6. Buster52

    Buster52 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 28, 2009
    Geronimo Oklahoma
    Quote:This is probably the most common theme among those of us who dreaded doing the deed for the first time. Once dead, it is just meat to be processed.

    What breed was he? Sounds like a leghorn.

    ETA
    And no, young roos don't tend to be tough, free range or not.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2009
  7. zowieyellowflame

    zowieyellowflame Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This roo was a mutt. Maybe black rosecomb mixed with americana and a bunch of other stuff.
    We were planning on roasting him for dinner.... and brining all afternoon. Not suggested?
     
  8. AHappychick

    AHappychick Wanna-be Farmer

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    westchester
    Quote:thats what I would do, the small young ones are always very tasty and tender [​IMG]

    you might want to wait until tomorrow as riger will be done by then. Muts are the tastiest too! my favorites for some reason are Araucanas lol
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2009
  9. Buster52

    Buster52 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Geronimo Oklahoma
    Quote:Don't know. We don't brine ours.
     
  10. zowieyellowflame

    zowieyellowflame Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Buster, I have not brined a free range, but the store bought, I take a handful each of fresh thyme, oregano, chives, parsley, a bit of cilantro, basil and whatever else I have, along with a few cloves of garlic, a celery stock, a carrot or two into a pot with enough water to cover. (if it is winter, just whatever you have) Once hot enough to simmer, I add about 3/4 cup each of salt and sugar...... yes, that much and yes, salt AND sugar. I simmer just a few minutes, until the salt and sugar disolve, maybe 5 min. Then cool, add ice if you want to speed things up. Then I fill a large bowl or pot with cold water, pour in this mixture, herbs, veg and all and add the chicken. I let him sit for a few hours or a day. When I am ready to cook, I drain the water, pat the chicken dry and return him to the fridge on a plate, uncovered for an hour. This allows the skin to "pucker" and give a crispy outside, juicy inside. Then he is roasted.
    All of this is fine and dandy but I am concerned with this chicken because rigor has not passed.... I don't know how that will affect the flavor, texture and I dont know how it will affect my "feelings". [​IMG]
    I would like to wait until tomorrow but we both work late the next few days so tonight is the only time we can both "enjoy" him at supper time.
     

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