Tons of questions, HELP!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by 4HMomma, Sep 12, 2010.

  1. 4HMomma

    4HMomma Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 12, 2010
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    I am going to have my layers tested for MG (I can't ever remember the whole word, sorry, I hope you know what I mean). IF they come back positive here is what I understand, please correct me if I'm wrong. IF it comes back positive, I will need to kill the entire herd. The phoenix birds I have that are not in the same pen but adjacent, and have had much the same symptoms, would need culled too, right? The new birds that we just got that are in quarantine that are not acting sick should be fine, right? I'd probably have them tested too, just to be safe. They are in the same coop, but in the first floor run and are nowhere near the affected flock. Then, when I get that daunting task done, I would need to totally clean their pens, bleach them down and let them set awhile, right? I'm really hoping I'm jumping the gun and that is not what they had/have, but I think it is... If I have to cull them all because of carrier status, could I stew the not currently sick ones or is that not safe? Help please?
     
  2. ThePamperedPullet

    ThePamperedPullet Chillin' With My Peeps

    Maybe to help ease your mind a bit, Mycoplasma is one of the most common bacteria in the US. I don't think any of us are immune to it. Mycoplasma bacteria are the cause for many of the respiratory ailments that affect poultry. Such diseases as CRD (chronic respiratory disease) and Coryza are both caused by Mycoplasma. If we all had to irradicate our flocks because of Mycoplasma then there wouldn't be any chickens left in the US. Mycoplasma symptoms are most easily controlled with medications such as Tylan and Erythomycin. Mycoplasma will never go away. It will sit in remission until your birds are placed under stress and then it will come back. There is nothing you can do about it. Birds that repeatedly show symptoms at regular intervals should be considered to be culled out just because of their weakened immune systems. It is something that you have to be aware of and you treat it at the first signs. If you have one bird that shows signs then it is very likely that all your birds have it. It is just a matter of when and if they ever show symptoms. We all deal with it on an on going basis. It is pretty much a part of raising chickens.
    The only disease that I am aware of that would cause you to have to destroy all your birds would be Pullorum.
    You can have your birds tested for Mycoplasma but it is pretty much a waste of money. Walk into your coup at night and sit and listen. If you hear any raspy breathing or gurgling sounds then you have Mycoplasma. You can seperate these birds and get them on antibiotics until they stop and then return them to your flock. Put a leg band on them and if they continue to repeatedly show signs then think about culling them out. After you "cure" them, they may never show signs again.
     
  3. 4HMomma

    4HMomma Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 12, 2010
    Nebraska
    Ok, that sounds much better!! My daugter was looking thru her 4h books and found what we *think* they have, and so I looked at a few sites and must have misunderstood. The girls want to start raising show chickens and I want to try to do it right, so I worry.

    So if I treat them with tylan soluable they should be ok for awhile, then start watching for my "culprits" that are sickly, right? Would you still suggest keeping the girls' "show breeders" away from the rest of the chickens? We had planned on wintering them all in the same large pen with smaller pens to seperate them so we don't have to deal with frozen waters and frostbite and so I don't see my eggs drop way off.
     
  4. Muggsmagee

    Muggsmagee Menagerie Mama

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    Dec 15, 2009
    Central NY
    Quote:My heart dropped at your initial post. [​IMG] Here's my suggestion...repost your chicken's symptoms/ailments. Maybe someone on here can stear you towards what the problem is so you can find a better solution. It would serve no purpose to treat them for something they may not have. [​IMG]
    Mycoplasma is not something I've been made aware of...good to have some info on it.
    Good luck.
    Edited to add...
    I just found this...utter coincidence. https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=196261 contact purple chicken...he's gone through something ridiculous with MG and is willing to offer his expertise.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2010
  5. 4HMomma

    4HMomma Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 12, 2010
    Nebraska
    Thank you. I sent purple chicken a message.
     
  6. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    Iceland
    To begin with I'll say MG is a debated topic here.

    Chances are your birds are infected with MG. That sucks and I'm sorry about that.

    Assuming they are MG positive you have two choices, treat or cull.

    When my last flock was infected I culled them since I was around other birds often and did not want to risk infecting a friend's flock. The strain of MG I had in my flock was bad too. Half of my silkies were either dead or dying. Young birds had their growth stunted and a few dropped. My standard layers got the infections, beat them on their own (I lost a few), and became carriers.


    I've read that as much as 85% of our flocks have MG. I see no evidence of this at all. I've gotten to know a few other chicken owners and only a few of them have had MG issues.

    Testing for MG in CT is an extra $1 a bird if the state is already here testing for Pullorem and AI. I can't speak for what it costs in other states.


    MG is easily killed in a coop. It only lasts a few days at most outside of a birds body. Disinfection occurs with simple cleanup and time.


    If you decide to keep your flock then you can treat with Tylan. Yes, your birds will be carriers but as long as you don't show or trade your birds than it's not a big deal.


    I will not bring any new birds into my flock any more, even with 30 days of isolation. The exceptions are day old chicks, fertile eggs, or birds from flocks I know are MG free.


    I'm no expert on this subject, just someone who has experienced MG first hand.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2010

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