Too cold?

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by khs2424, Sep 21, 2011.

  1. khs2424

    khs2424 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 24, 2011
    My eastern turkeys are 5 weeks old today. They have been off the lamp for a couple of weeks now and seem to be doing fine. My question is, I'm wanting to get them outside and it's getting down to 64 tonight here in central Alabama. Would that be too cold for them? They are staying in my unheated/non-air conditioned garage right now with no signs of stress. My biggest worry other than cold is predators. Already lost one to a 6 foot rat snake that came in my garage. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] He paid dearly for that mistake.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2011
  2. zowieyellowflame

    zowieyellowflame Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh my God! I can't believe you have snakes that kill turkeys!
     
  3. Lagerdogger

    Lagerdogger Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 30, 2010
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    I keep mine inside for six weks, then put them out into whatever the weather brings. My brooder has a screen porch that they start to use at aobut three weeks. By five weeks they don't want to go inside, no matter how cold it is. I think the temperature would not be a problem for them, especially if it is dry.
     
  4. khs2424

    khs2424 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 24, 2011
    Thanks Lagerdogger!
     
  5. StevenSRitchie

    StevenSRitchie Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 21, 2011
    Since Turkeys grow feathers much faster than chickens you can definitely put them out at four and five weeks. Turkey poults instictively stay warm at night by laying close together on the ground. They receive warmth from each other and from their feathers. I would not be concerned unless the temperature went down below 50 degrees Farenheit. I would not let young poults free range by themselves because they are easily taken by predators. Keep them in a secure (poultry fenced) area with a secure house and run. Do not leave your new poults out in inclement weather without a shelter for them to get into to escape getting wet. Wet poults will get cold and may die. The same holds true for adult birds. Always provide a good shelter to escape the wind and rain.
     
  6. StevenSRitchie

    StevenSRitchie Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 21, 2011
    The best way to keep predators away from poultry and all livestock is to obtain a Great Pyreneese (always forget how to spell it) or some other breed of dog that is bred to protect livestock. Our pyrenese guardion dog protects both our poultry and our larger livestock from all predators. She has never harmed any of our animals or birds but has always protected them from all predators. We have coyotes, fox, bears, wolves, and even mountain lions in our area (Northern Maine). We keep our young turkey poults in closed fenced in areas until they are large enough to escape being eaten by hawks and eagles.
     
  7. Debbi

    Debbi Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:That said, when you go to buy a guardian dog of any breed, make sure that they are used on the same animals that you want them to protect! A dog that was used to guarding sheep, may have never seen a chicken or turkey in it's life, and will kill them as quickly as they will a predator! Best to start with a puppy, that has been raised around poultry as well as other animals. Let them sleep with or near the animals they are going to protect, with a seperation in the very beginning so they don't reak havoc in the middle of the night. Also remember, these dogs are there to do a job, they are not supposed to be pets. The Pyrs are friendly and like being around people too much for my liking. The best LGD I ever saw was a Pyr/Komondor cross. That dog killed her share of coyotes in her day, and would stay with an injured animal and bark until you came out to see what the fuss was. She was friendly to those she knew, but stand-offish to strangers. She would rather be with her flock of sheep in three feet of snow and wind, than to be laying by a fire with her owner. She was a great dog.
     

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