Too many cockerels

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by iLikeMineFried, Aug 25, 2016.

  1. iLikeMineFried

    iLikeMineFried Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 29, 2016
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    I have a flock of 10, and sadly 3 are cockerels. I only meant for one to be a cockerel, and I know this is quite common. I am one of those who names all her chickens and gets attached. I am going to have to cut back to one cockerel as they get older, but the choice is difficult. I have no way of separating them, as their run is attached to the coop. I am trying to enjoy them as much as possible before I have to make my choice. How do I choose?
     
  2. kysilkies

    kysilkies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We face that often, we pick 2, as long as they'll get along, so we have back up or if one turns into a meanie or alpha(we get rid of alphas). If not, Craigslist should get rid of them easily for you! Now choosing, that's your cross to bear! ;-)
     
  3. iLikeMineFried

    iLikeMineFried Out Of The Brooder

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    So far my GLW and Austrolorp cockerels get along well, with the GLW being a little more diligent in his duties. The OE is from a younger group of 4, but he is already trying to peck at my older GLW pullets before the GLW cockerel shuts him down.
     
  4. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    As your roosters mature more they will start making troubles like making the hens scream, over mating and potentially trying to attack you. I always have my favorites, but will begin to remove them as they become too much. Many times you end up with the more mellow ones. So take your time and let their behaviors, and your hens behaviors be your guide. It can help to set up a temporary pen to house the ones removed for a week or two before deciding their fate, as often removing roosters causes other roosters to act different, which can change your mind.
     
  5. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    Really, I would recommend culling all three roosters. An all hen flock is a nice flock to start with and get some experience with, and I have a theory that roosters raised with only flock mates tend to be bullies, aggressive and often times a nightmare. Roosters raised with an established flock have some manners in chicken society thumped into them by older birds.

    That way you don't have to choose, remove them all, your pullets will thank you, as the roosters are sexually active long before the pullets. If you keep them until they get rude, it is not so hard to let them go.

    Mrs K
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Well, fry them! hahah, a funny in regards to your screen name.

    Agrees with Mrs. K.

    ...and a chicken keeper should always have a place to segregate birds, I find having a few foldable wire dog crates to be invaluable.
    24"L x 18"W x 19"H with smaller mesh(1x2) added to the bottom under the tray work very well.
     
  7. iLikeMineFried

    iLikeMineFried Out Of The Brooder

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    I will be watching my boys for changes and I will separate them from the flock as needed. I do have 2 extra large wire dog crates and some leftover fencing and hardware cloth. How long can I leave a bird in a cage? Until they are large enough to cull? Should I cull them at the beginning of winter even if they are not full size? They are only 12 weeks old now.
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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  9. carlf

    carlf Chillin' With My Peeps

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    12 weeks is plenty old enough to butcher. They will be small but very tender and tasty. If you dont want to butcher them, put them on craigslist.

    Whether or not you decide to keep a rooster is your decision. I would love to have a roo but our ordinances prohibit it. The option of letting a broody hen set a bunch of fertile eggs is cool, lets you restock your own flock.
    If you decide to keep one, you may or may not need to separate him when he starts puberty to let him mature and keep him from over-mating the pullets.
    You will also need to make sure he understands that you are dominant, the Alpha, or you will have problems with him trying to dominate you.. Lots of other posts on this.

    How to chose is difficult. Pick the one you like the best, is the prettiest, calmest, etc., now and hope for the best.
     
  10. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    I have had two mean Roosters....I mean very mean Roosters....The last one was horrid..
    If you really do not need one? Get rid of it. This year I never kept a cockerel back...My pullets are so content without the constant breeding and attention from the Rooster.
    I would Cull all three Roosters...Keep the hens....
     

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