Too much humidity and I haven't added any water

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Judys Brood, Apr 27, 2017.

  1. Judys Brood

    Judys Brood New Egg

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    Dec 11, 2015
    I am on day 13th and my humidity continues to run about 65 percent. I have tried everything I could to bring it down. I have not added any water to the incubator but have been told that I should go ahead and add water.
    This is a starafoam incubator and I understand it is extremely hard to control the humidity in one of these. Our humidity is running around 70 to 80 percent due to our weather.

    Should I go ahead and add water?
     
  2. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Oct 11, 2014
    Gouverneur, NY
    No. If it's that high it's all ready too high. You don't want to add water. Have you ever checked the accuracy of the hygrometer and have you checked the growth of your air cells?
     
  3. Judys Brood

    Judys Brood New Egg

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    Dec 11, 2015
    Ok I have lost this batch of eggs. I never could get the humidity down.

    So now I am looking at incubators that are able to control the humidity. What would be a good one to invest in? I do know I will not buy another starfoam one though in the fall I have had fairly good sucess with this one. But the past three batches have resulted in this kind of results;
    40 eggs 13 chicks
    38 eggs 6 chicks
    39 eggs 0 chicks (this one averaged 65 percent and I never added any water.


    So I am looking at what type of incubator to buy.
     
  4. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Oct 11, 2014
    Gouverneur, NY
    I don't know of any table top incubators that actually control humidity. Humidity is controlled by us. Units like Brinsea have humidity pumps, but again it's the water you put in them that determines the humidity. I have a friend that was hatching during a humid period and she bought the charcoal/carbon mix that you can buy at the dollar stores to decrease room humidity, people use it in campers as well. I believe she put a quarter cup in a bowl in the bator to bring the humidity down and had to change it every couple of days. It worked for her and no adverse effects on the eggs. Using a dehumidifier in the room the incubator is in can also help, but they aren't cheap if you don't already have one.

    The wooden cabinet incubators seem to hatch better at higher humidity levels from what I've seen through discussions on here, you may want to feel out some of the members that use those types of bators for their opinions.
     

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