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Too much red pepper or is it the valbazen?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by EggyErin, Oct 24, 2011.

  1. EggyErin

    EggyErin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yesterday, I added copious amounts of red pepper to the feed to keep the blasted squirrels out. Last night, I dewormed. This morning, everybody was on the floor hanging out but not eating. When I stepped into the coop, there were a few who went for the feeder but didn't eat much. I opened the chicken door and went to feed the horses. Afterward, I checked the coop and everybody was still inside hanging out (except one rooster who I think was trying to call everyone out). They're all out now, but did I put out too much red pepper? I've read that it doesn't bother them but now I'm not so sure. Can deworming leave them a bit lethargic at first? Maybe they were just afraid I was going to put something else down their hatches.[​IMG]
     
  2. saladin

    saladin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Deworming can make them somewhat lethargic. I've never known the pepper to do so.

    However, it is possible that you just over did it. The pepper will make them thristy. I'm guessing the Valbazen was added to the water? If so, then they probably drank much more than normal; thus, their intake of the valbazen was above normal.
     
  3. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Deworming can lead to problems if the worm load was too great. That is why Wazine is recommended for a pre-wormer 14 days before Valbazen. Wazine only kills round worms and then Valbazen does the rest. By skipping the first step, you can endanger your birds especially if this is the first time they are being wormed. Too many dead worms at once essentially poisons the bird.
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Deworming your birds certainly makes your birds feel better when they excrete or digest the dead or dying worms. The chickens start acting like a chicken should...running around, eating/drinking normally, laying eggs, scratching dirt etc....A wormy bird is lethagic, unthrifty, wont eat/drink/lay eggs.
    Valbazen slowly kills worms over 3-4 day period. Not like wazine that flushes large roundworms out all at once, and could be a problem if there's a severe roundworm infestation possibly causing a blockage. No need to worry about toxic dead worm overload with valbazen.
    Mixing valbazen in water dilutes its effectiveness. If you dosed them orally undiluted with valbazen 1/2cc for standards and 1/4cc for smaller birds, overdosing is not an issue. It is a safe wormer much like safeguard.
     
  5. mstricer

    mstricer Overrun With Chickens

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    Do you guys deworm because you see worms or it's a precautionary thing just in case. I've never dewormed I try to give the treats such as an pumpkin pulp and seeds.
     
  6. EggyErin

    EggyErin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This isn't the first time the matrons have been dewormed but it is the first time for the young layers. I dosed orally and did as the instructions said - mix 8cc water with 1cc valbazen and give 2cc per chicken. I know they needed to be dewormed; they just weren't very thrifty-looking and they free-range, plus there has been some runny poop. Now they're out and about. I'll monitor the eating and drinking just to be on the safe side.

    However, in the way of Murphy's Law, after two months of molting, eggless matrons and a week of no eggs from the young ones (contrariness, I'm sure), today I get three eggs![​IMG] Ugh - 10 more days of throwing out my beloved eggs.
     
  7. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:Keep in mind that between molting, shortness of daylight hours and cooler temps, all these factors have an effect on laying. This is the time of year they slow down laying...nature's way of giving them a rest and getting them ready for spring laying.
     
  8. EggyErin

    EggyErin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, Professor Dawg, I have been a good student and done my homework about these egg-laying things. I can even handle all that. But...it's just too unfair that they deliver three lovely eggs the day AFTER I deworm!
     
  9. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:Professor Dawg? Hahahahaha! I wish lol. Yeah, the same thing happens to me too sometimes. If you lived closer, I'd give you a bunch of eggs. We dont eat many eggs and I'm getting ready to give some to my neighbors.
     
  10. EggyErin

    EggyErin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Maybe there should be a "Professor" award to confer on all the revered sages of chicken wisdom.[​IMG] I think everyone on this forum would vote you in!
     

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