Too Much Ventilation? Fort Rocks Coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by crazychickenwom, Apr 6, 2012.

  1. crazychickenwom

    crazychickenwom Chirping

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    Feb 10, 2012
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    I am nearing completion on my coop and I am concerned about having too much ventilation and need some ideas. I will describe as I go, thank you for your advice and help!

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    Front of the coop. The majority of wind and rain / snow blows from this side so we decided to completely enclose the roof. We have installed prop open windows, covered with hardware cloth, which can be opened easily to allow for air flow as needed. The doors on the left side will also have similar windows, as soon as we find some. The overall dimensions of the coop are 14 feet x 7 feet, approximately, and 10 feet tall in center, 5 feet on end.

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    Each end is open about 8 inches from the top of the wall to the bottom of the tin. I will be reinforcing with hardware cloth to prevent predators, but plan on leaving this open for ventilation permanently. With the large overhangs I am not concerned about rain / snow getting in. There will also be a large window on each side that can be opened as needed.

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    This side in my main concern. The entire section is open and will be covered with hardware cloth. The wind and rain hardly ever blow in from this side of the coop, but I will watch for any "wet" spots. The run will also be extended from this side and prop doors will be added. I had planned to partially cover unneeded ventilation space in the fall / winter, but I am not sure how much to cover. My idea was to leave the top 1 1/2 foot of the peak open and enclose the rest with plywood that I can remove easily. Would this be too much ventilation when considering the others in the sides of the coop?

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    This is the roof before the tin, to get a better idea on size if needed. Again, thanks for your help! Also, if it makes a difference I will be using the DLM and will have about 30 chickens.
     

  2. canesisters

    canesisters Songster

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    I have been in 'learning mode' for quite some time now and haven't gotten my chickens yet... But I have been under the assumption that as long as the wind doesn't blow ON roosting chickens - you can pretty much never have too much ventilation.
    You might want to look into the 'open air' coops for more tips on finishing yours.
    Looks great - by the way. [​IMG]
     
  3. crazychickenwom

    crazychickenwom Chirping

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    Thanks so much! The roosts will be below the "draft" and will most likely be on the sides of the coop to allow for poop boards under them. The nest boxes will be placed on the side with the most wind, (on the outside) and insulated against drafts. I sure never thought that my little project would turn into something so big! LOL <...chicken math...>
     
  4. crazychickenwom

    crazychickenwom Chirping

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    Feb 10, 2012
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    Anyone else have an idea?
     

  5. mcjessen

    mcjessen Songster

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    I think what you have planned sounds good. My only concern would be rain getting in. You stated that it hardly ever rains from that direction but what happens when if does? So, if you could protect against any rain getting in, that would be the best. I'm not sure how you would do that unless you ran a peaked roof on the run about 5 ft (or farther out based on the height of your coop roof) out from the main coop. You'd want the roof over the run to be functional as well. That way you could just hardware cloth that section in and leave it open. Covering the run would most likely take care of the chance of any rain getting in. I'm glad we covered our run because was a soupy mess in the section that wasn't covered.
     
  6. 3forfree

    3forfree Songster

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  7. Marengoite

    Marengoite Songster

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    With the back and sides as tight as they are, and the DLM for bedding, I think this is perfectly fine. Chickens are covered in natural insulation and as long as they stay dry, staying warm isn't likely a problem, especially for chickens bred for Ohio winters. The bigger worry in most chicken houses is not enough ventilation rather than too much. If your open side is facing the south, I would think all your little red hens should stay nice and cozy even through the coldest winters.
     

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