too old to castrate?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by onesimplequestion, Jan 10, 2011.

  1. onesimplequestion

    onesimplequestion New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    Jan 10, 2011
    hello there,

    we have a rooster, about 8.5 months old, and we are thinking about castrating him as to eliminate the chance of fertilized eggs (we got our first one in the pan this morning. eew.).

    I am familiar with the time lines for creating a capon, and I understand that we are much past that.

    I am curious to know if castrating the rooster at this age is still "safe" and if there are any negative consequences that I am unfamiliar with which could occur...? We are ok with having an infertile fat ball-less wonder pecking about the pasture.

    ...Or... am I better off sacrificing him to the stock pot? Coq au Vin? etc.


    Thanks

    -Matt
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2011
  2. SteveH

    SteveH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 10, 2009
    West/Central IL
    Quote:I don't know about caponizing the roo , but a fertile egg takes very close examination to tell if its fertile or not . What you were seeing was most likely part of the chicken's reproductive tract sluffed off into the egg ; looks nasty raw but perfectly fine once cooked .
    ETA [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2011
  3. onesimplequestion

    onesimplequestion New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    Jan 10, 2011
    there was a bloody mass inside the egg attached to the side of the yolk, floating in the albumen...when we cracked it open, bloody liquid sort of spewed out of the egg into the pan...not sure if that's fertilized, but it seems to fit the descriptions i've read...?
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2011
  4. sgtmom52

    sgtmom52 Birds & Bees

    Sounds like a blood or meat spot which has nothing to do with fertility. The only way it would be related to fertility is if you left a hen incubate an egg for a week or so before cracking the egg.

    A fertile egg looks like this the one on this thread ~ note the white spot on the yolk.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=4790736
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2011
  5. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

    34,028
    451
    448
    Feb 5, 2009
    South Georgia
    Quote:This is a mistake in the hen's egg making machinery. Has nothing to do with the presence or absence of a rooster, fertile or not.
     
  6. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

    16,242
    104
    336
    Oct 19, 2009
    Forks, WA
    Has nothing to do with the fertility or a chick being in there. Fertile eggs are completely edible and look almost nothing different from normal, infertile eggs. There is no need to Caponize your rooster.
     
  7. Tiffrz-N-Kidz

    Tiffrz-N-Kidz Chillin' With My Peeps

    306
    6
    111
    Jul 29, 2010
    Aledo, TX
    My understanding is that at this age the blood vessel that goes to the testicles is quite well developed and unless you use some sort of cauterizing cutting tool, you would be more likely to end up with the bird bleeding to death than if he were cut at a young age.

    However, since you are OK with the idea of coq-au-vin, if you really want a gelded roo around I'd say give it a go but have the scalder and plucker at the ready.

    ETA - As it may not be the poor guy's fault there is 'stuff' in the eggs, maybe he should get left intact.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2011
  8. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Quote:This is a mistake in the hen's egg making machinery. Has nothing to do with the presence or absence of a rooster, fertile or not.

    +1

    That's the hen's fault. You won't be able to tell the difference of a fertile or non fertile egg. Some hens are genetically pre disposed to having meat spots. New layers especially, can often burst capillaries in their reproductive tract when making their first eggs.
     
  9. onesimplequestion

    onesimplequestion New Egg

    3
    0
    7
    Jan 10, 2011
    thank you so much for your quick replies. i was a little sad at the thought of having to de-ball/eat the guy.


    i realize i am in the wrong forum for this question now, but should i expect the one hen to continue having this problem?
     
  10. SteveH

    SteveH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 10, 2009
    West/Central IL
    Quote:It's possible , but not necessarily going to be a problem . Pullets usually grow out of it .
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by