Took in a stray white silkie bantam cockerel today....what now?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by YakLady, Sep 11, 2009.

  1. YakLady

    YakLady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 8, 2009
    Detroit area
    Sorry, I've been so busy with my yak herd that I haven't been on here in awhile. A lady came over today and asked me if I was missing a white chicken. I said no, all 13 were present and accounted for. She said that she had asked all the other people around, and no one would claim this chicken. She said it had been living at the end of her driveway for at least 4 days. She asked me to come get it because of the chances of getting killed by predators. I went to investigate, and found an adorable white silkie bantam cockerel. Her driveway was very long (couldn't even see her house), and the chicken had been living at the end of it which is right off of a main dirt road. I had to go back several times during the day before my husband was finally able to catch him. We immediately fell in love with the little guy, and my husband named him Frickin. Anywho.... my other 13 free-range, and when they came home and discovered the Silkie, they attacked him. The poor little guy buried his head in a corner, and started trembling. I ran in and saved him, and we closed the flock in the indoor portion of the coop. The outdoor portion is completely predator-proof, so we set him up out there. We took out my old brooder box, and stood it on its side. We put in some straw, and some food and water. Tomorrow we will be at the U of M game all day (Go Blue!!!) and late into the night, so the flock will not be allowed to free range. We plan to scoot the box up to the chicken wire to keep him isolated from the rest of the flock. I have to let them out at least into the outside portion of the coop, because they are not used to having to stay fenced in. So my question, as a new chicken owner, is.... how do I introduce this little guy to my flock without them killing him? He's absolutely adorable-I think someone probably just dumped him on the side of the road because he's a rooster. I don't care-he deserves a happy life, too. I have two roosters- 1 is a full grown RIR (Jarhead), and the other 1 is a young something-or-other that is appropriately named Fried Chicken (he will be in about a week or two). So Frickin makes 3. Jarhead and the hens were the ones who attacked Frickin. Any ideas on how to make sure this little guy gets a shot at life without my other chickens ending it?

    Thanks a bunch!!!!!!
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2009
  2. AkTomboy

    AkTomboy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 21, 2009
    DJ, Alaska
    It is very nice of you to take him in. The normal rule for getting new chickens and even more so for ones who you dont know the background on you put them in a quarantine for 30 days. That way you know that they do not have any health issues that could spread to your flock. Then after that you put them where the old flock can see them but not get to them. After a few weeks then you slip them in one night after all of the flock has gone to sleep. As far as getting Jarehead letting him in his flock I hope you get some ideas from others. I have 5 roos who all get along but they were all under 14 weeks when we got them. Hope I have helped some. OO and post pics [​IMG]
     
  3. ThePolishPrincess

    ThePolishPrincess Chillin' With My Peeps

    It's good you got him. [​IMG] But I agree, you don't know where he's been and for all you know, he could have a developing illness that can effect your flock. Keep him isolated for at least 1 month if you don't know where he's been. After that, feel free to start introducing him to your own birds. They probably will go after him, as any newcomer usually falls victim to the flock, but if you bring him around a few times a day and keep an eye out, they'll get used to each other. And if you free-range them, it works out even better. He can hang out with the flock and run away if threatened. If there is no blood-shed, leave him to free-range and over time- the flock will get used to his presence. But if he starts to bleed, take him away, right away, and keep him isolated until his wounds are healed. You might come across trouble, but Silkie roosters are really very tough little guys.

    My birds are smarter than they look. I tried the 'leave them in at night and have them wake up to 'new' pals in the morning' trick and they noticed that there were a few birds to many, right away. Sometimes this trick works, other time, no.

    ALSO, you only have 13 chickens, Yaklady? The real ratio of birds in 1 roo to every 9 hens. I think Jarhead attacked most likely out of over-protection, but later on, he will begin to attack because there are too few females and he wants to keep Mr. Silkie in line. That will begin to take a toll on your new roo and your flock in total. Maybe get some more birds?
     
  4. YakLady

    YakLady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 8, 2009
    Detroit area
    Ok, thanks for that advice. We have enjoyed him so much that now we're talking about dividing the coop so that we can get some more 'pretty' birds like him. So we'll be sure to get hens for him. Sure do wish I knew more about these different breeds. I'm not sure what to do with a few Silkies, other than the fact that they're cute as heck-lol. As I mentioned, Jarhead is mostly RIR, but I think he's got a little somethin' else in him, too (maybe Austrolorp-there's alot of greenish-black in him). The hens are mutt-hens, but I love them and they're great layers. A lady who was doing scientific research on them ended up losing her grant money this year, and had to get rid of all her chickens. She had over 600, and she just gave them away to various small farms. Thanks again, and I will post pics soon.
     
  5. dixiechick

    dixiechick Chillin' With My Peeps

    I keep a breeding trio...2 hens per roo. When I introduce new roos, I separate them so they can see each other for about a week or so. Let your regulars out to roam, as usual (just as I do)...then under supervision open the door to Frickin. He may come out or not...but he has an option. Mine always come out a little at a time. Sometimes they just come to the threshold and run back in. Then the next day, they step out and run back in.

    Jarhead is sure to put Frickin in his place because Jarhead is the head roo, but soon enough he will accept him.


    Getting Frickin some ladies could help him establish his own flock in a separate part of the yard. That's pretty much what happened with my Pinky and Lilac.

    All hope is not lost....

    Good for you rescuing Frickin (his name is hilarious! I can just picture my own DH saying something like...Frickin' bird..) too funny.. [​IMG]

    Keep us poste.
     
  6. ThePolishPrincess

    ThePolishPrincess Chillin' With My Peeps

    I agree with Dixie. The Silkie would be able to 'establish' his own flock if he's the dominant roo. Silkies are great 'pet' chickens and hens go broody like crazy. They make excellent mothers. I like exhibition breeds. Funky, pretty, interesting, and no two breeds are alike. [​IMG] It sounds like Frickin will have a great life. [​IMG] Lol, I also can't imagine naming a bird that. Especially because I call them by name.
     

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