Traveling long distance with two Pekin ducks

Luizalas

In the Brooder
Sep 24, 2019
3
21
34
Please move this to the duck forum! I’m dumb and can’t figure out this website lol.

My husband got orders to go to North Carolina and we’ll be leaving in the winter time. I’m currently in Illinois and the drive should be about 10 hours (we drive at night). Well have a truck with a back row of seats but we also have two cats and a large dog. I was thinking if we put the ducks in the bed of the truck, what would be the steps to make it as stress free as possible??? So far I’ve thought of putting them in the XL dog kennel and wrapping a tarp around it with decent sized holes where the crate naturally has holes to ventilate but not too many so the wind doesn’t go wild in there. What we originally wanted was to put a tarp over the bed to protect our belongings (clothes in luggage’s)but idk if that will be doable with the ducks in the back. There won’t be any room in the back with a cat kennel hosting two cats and a large dog so how do we make this work??? Would they be fine since they won’t overheat or should I just sit in the bed the whole time lol. I am NOT leaving them behind. All long distance travel tips are welcomed and appreciated! Please be nice this is my first time owning ducks and the change of duty station came so suddenly.
 

BullChick

Enslaved by a Duckling
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
Apr 17, 2012
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Coffee shop in zone 5
Wrapping the lower section of the crate should be enough. They can lay down to avoid the wind. :lol: I have traveled with dogs, fish and poultry on the motorcycle, and believe me, we were not keeping at 65-ish. 90+!!
Cardboard boxes are suitable too. They won’t love being cramped, but you don’t want them sliding around either.
If you cover the bed of the truck, have the carrier near the opening for the best oxygen.
 

Shezadandy

Crowing
5 Years
Sep 26, 2015
2,288
2,951
377
Portland OR
Whatever way you choose to move them, I would suggest obtaining some 1/4 or 1/2" rubber mat for the bottom- Crates and cardboard are very slippery. The farm stores usually carry it in a roll and sell it by the foot- looks like a horse stall mat but thinner. It's usually 30" or 48" wide, and very, very easy to cut with a boxcutter. That will help them keep their footing and might help with their overall comfort on the drive.

Or something like a rubber doormat --- I suggest all one piece so it won't move around under their feet. When we moved our chickens, we had lots of bumpy, curvy, hilly roads to go down - the rubber mats let them keep their footing - not a single chicken scrambled for footing the whole ride.

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/utility-rubber-mat-black-4-ft-x-3-ft-x--frac12-in
https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/rectangular-rubber-doormat
 

Luizalas

In the Brooder
Sep 24, 2019
3
21
34
Whatever way you choose to move them, I would suggest obtaining some 1/4 or 1/2" rubber mat for the bottom- Crates and cardboard are very slippery. The farm stores usually carry it in a roll and sell it by the foot- looks like a horse stall mat but thinner. It's usually 30" or 48" wide, and very, very easy to cut with a boxcutter. That will help them keep their footing and might help with their overall comfort on the drive.

Or something like a rubber doormat --- I suggest all one piece so it won't move around under their feet. When we moved our chickens, we had lots of bumpy, curvy, hilly roads to go down - the rubber mats let them keep their footing - not a single chicken scrambled for footing the whole ride.

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/utility-rubber-mat-black-4-ft-x-3-ft-x--frac12-in
https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/rectangular-rubber-doormat
Awesome idea!!! I’ll look into it :)
 

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