Treating Sick Gecko-Graphic-

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by LeafBlade12345, Jan 28, 2016.

  1. LeafBlade12345

    LeafBlade12345 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Hello,
    As some of you may know, I keep and breed leopard geckos as a side hobby. Geckos are very prone to humidity change problems and heat-based complications. I own a small female carrot tail who was having trouble with a shed. She is young, about one or two years old, so technically a baby. After her last shed, she couldn't get the shed off of herself completely and stopped eating entirely. Her weight dropped off fast, and now her tail is stick thin. Her bones are almost protruding. She was taken to a reptile vet, who prescribed antibiotics, calcium supplement, and critical care food. Her first treatment was yesterday. We made her a small humidity box as well, which she has been spending time in. She is malnourished and dehydrated, so her chances of survival are thin. Her eyes are sealed shut and she is lethargic. I will post a picture when I get the time. She responded well to last night's syringe feeding and ate a teaspoon of critical care along with her meds and the calcium supplement. I will keep this thread updated on her conditions. She is so young, I'd really hate to lose her. :(

    Regards,
    Leaf

    Edited for details.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2016
  2. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    If you can get her through this critical time and she is starting to recover, have a fecal sample tested by the vet. It is almost certain due to the stress of illness there could be a proliferation of internal parasites. That would knock her down another notch if that occurs and is not treated.
     
  3. LeafBlade12345

    LeafBlade12345 Chillin' With My Peeps


    She does not have internal parasites, but we will do another fecal sample. Thank you for your advice. ;)

    Regards,
    Leaf
     
  4. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Jan 19, 2011
    Escanaba, MI
    If you feed any live prey such as crickets, they have to potential to pass on internal parasites. Pinworms is a common one crickets carry. Raising food items yourself in a clean, controlled reduces that significantly (Blaptica dubia roaches are so easy too). Store insects can be a bit dubious at times...ew.
     
  5. LeafBlade12345

    LeafBlade12345 Chillin' With My Peeps


    I don't feed crickets nor roaches. We will most definitely take the fecal samples though, as we feed mealworms who can contract parasites. I wasn't sure we hadn't done a fecal test, but it was for my old male, not this young one. ;)

    Regards,
    Leaf
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2016
  6. LeafBlade12345

    LeafBlade12345 Chillin' With My Peeps

    This is my second successful feeding and treatment. Gecko looks slightly better. I opened up the hole to the humidity box a bit and wet the sponges, cleaning it out. The male who currently resides with her is eating fine.

    Regards,
    Leaf
     
  7. LeafBlade12345

    LeafBlade12345 Chillin' With My Peeps

    So, the feeding wasn't very successful at all. Gecko vomited most, if not all, of the food. I syringe-fed her some warm water, but her prognosis is very guarded and hopes of survival are low. She will either pass away or respond to treatment within the next few days, so I am not having her euthanized. Sigh...this is so frustrating.

    Regards,
    Leaf
     
  8. LeafBlade12345

    LeafBlade12345 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Here are some pics, if they will upload.

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    Regards,
    Leaf
     
  9. Dianacatz

    Dianacatz Chillin' With My Peeps

    Are her eyes still shut?

    Wishes,
    Diana
     
  10. Dianacatz

    Dianacatz Chillin' With My Peeps

    I am really not sure on how to help you here. Has she eaten yet? Drunk water today? I am caring for my cat which is on constant medication for her life. I feed her water with a syringe when taking her pills (especially aspirin). She has low appetitive but when she was in a critical condition she was hand fed. Have you tried that yet?

    Wishes,
    Diana

    (Hope your gecko gets better soon)
     

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