Trimming Roosters Spurs

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by angelburch, Sep 26, 2011.

  1. angelburch

    angelburch New Egg

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    Has anyone had any experience "trimming" a roosters spurs? I was given a beautiful rooster (along with 2 hens that he considers are "his"), and I already have 8 hens (1 is sitting on a nest of 12 eggs), and 1 rooster. These 2 guys are currently separated in the barn, but they do a lot of posturing and ruffling of their neck feathers (with a wall covered in wire between them). I know that if I let them loose together they are probably going to start fighting. Someone mentioned trimming their spurs so they couldn't do serious harm to each other, until they figured out the new pecking order. I've never done anything like that and am hesitant to do anything that seems harmful. My chickens roam outside (with 2 pygmy goats and our Livestock Guard Dog) during the day, but come in the barn at night to roost. I'd appreciate any suggestions, or ideas on how to keep the injuries to a minimum.
     
  2. ChicKat

    ChicKat Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    Hi Angel,



    I like this guys Youtube demo. Don't have a rooster, never de-spurred, but if I did, I would. :O)
    You can find other examples if you search youtube.
     
  3. pawsplus

    pawsplus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Before I watch that video--are they TRIMMING the nails or are they surgically removing the spurs? I'm not gonna watch if the latter (all this surgery w/out anesthesia is really pretty sick). But if it's trimming I need to see that.

    Thanks!
     
  4. stoopid

    stoopid Chicken Fairy Godmother

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    Depending on the breed, I have found most spurs to be similar to toenails. I use the nail clippers on them, at an angle, and chip away a little at a time. Kind of like sharpening a pencil angle. When you are happy with the length, or hit blood, stop.
     
  5. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:I didn`t watch the vidio, but I can tell ya that trimming rooster spurs is a common practice and the rooster NEVER acts like he`s wounded or injured. In fact, he will act as if nothing has happened at all. It`s common for him to lose a small amount of blood, but stuff like baking flour, steptyc powder, or even applying pressure for a few minutes will stop any bleeding. My prefference is trimming with a dremmel tool using a cut off wheel. Cut the spur 1/2 inch or so from the leg. The rooster will squirm from the unfamiliar vibration of the dremmel, but any pain is brief and he will act as if nothing has happened. The heat generated in trimming will cauterize the spur and no bleeding will usually occure.

    Something else you should know. Depending on the breeds involved, roosters can do mortal damage, even without spurs. With regular barnyard breeds this seldom happens as early in the conflict, one of them usually runs. This is good. But sometimes both are mature enough so that determination is prevalent. Be prepared. Good luck with your newbies. Keep us posted........Pop
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2011
  6. Achickenwrangler#1

    Achickenwrangler#1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You could also 'dull' them up a bit with an emery board (get the kind used for fake nails) I use them on the dogs, remember the beaks can damage too, best to introduce them now or in the winter - don't wait till spring!!!!!!!!
     
  7. Babe77

    Babe77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Before I watch that video--are they TRIMMING the nails or are they surgically removing the spurs? I'm not gonna watch if the latter (all this surgery w/out anesthesia is really pretty sick). But if it's trimming I need to see that.

    I did watch the video and the way he does it, the rooster did not make any sound whatsoever or move and all he did was "twist at the base of the spur gently with pliers" and it popped right off.​
     
  8. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:I did watch the video and the way he does it, the rooster did not make any sound whatsoever or move and all he did was "twist at the base of the spur gently with pliers" and it popped right off.

    I`ve seen that vid before. That`s not a solution to angelburch`s problem. That method leaves the root of the spur, which is soft, but sharp. In a few days it hardens to a slightly smaller spur and is still a weapon. It`s a good alternative for some folks, just not this time........Pop
     
  9. FisherMOM

    FisherMOM Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 7, 2008
    Bergen, NY
    I just take pliers, grab the spur and twist... it's fast and easy. Then let the roo down and he is good to go.
    There is a little blood.. but nothing to worry about at all.

    I tried trimming them a few times.. and that is very traumatic for them to be held down and snipped at.
     
  10. kfacres

    kfacres Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I did watch the video and the way he does it, the rooster did not make any sound whatsoever or move and all he did was "twist at the base of the spur gently with pliers" and it popped right off.

    Yes, you are correct.. I have done this many, many times... I've even had faster growing spurred roo's, that needed it done quite regularly.

    I have found, that if the roo has a baby spur underneath the removed shell cap... that it doesn't take all that long for that spur to harden up and become a weapon like the first one. I have found that by twisting off the outside cap, and then take a pair of side cutters, pruning shears, or scissors and removing the entire spur... you save yourself quite alot of time in the future... They bleed a little, but not bad.... not even enough to want to worry about stopping the blood flow...
     

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