Trout Indian Runner Genetics

picky

Chirping
Jun 17, 2015
38
8
64
Hi,
I have a question that has been bugging me for a long time now. When I used to have runners the regular trout, I had a blue trout hatch out of the clutch. I understand that there is blue trout and apricot trout, but can you get those out of a regular trout? Will it be almost the same genes approach like BSB and Paint silkies?
I kind of understand this gene thing but not that much.

Thank you!
 

Duck Hill

Songster
5 Years
Jun 17, 2015
380
500
172
South Carolina
That should not happen. My understanding is:

Regular trout is M+M+ li li without any Blue gene.

Blue trout is M+M+ li li Bl (one partially dominant blue gene).

Saxony is M+M+ li li Bl Bl (two blue genes).

However, there seem to be shades of each color, and that can really affect how a duck or drake looks.

I thought the drakelet on the left, below, was a "Blue" harlequin in color because his spots looked grey in color, and because his coloring is so pale as compared to his "Not Blue" brother.
DSC08380.JPG
However, when his wing feathers came in, he had bright blue color on his speculum. You can see it peeking out of his wing below (drakelet on the right side). This means he does NOT carry the "Blue" gene - just two harlequin "lih" genes, the same as his brother above. I don't know what makes his color so light compared to a normal harlequin duckling, but it CANNOT be a "blue" gene since he has the blue color on the wing speculum.

Below, you can see the blue color peeking out of his wing (if you make the picture larger). The duckling on the left in this picture is half-harlequin in color and carries a light gene, so probably M+M+ and lih li.

DSC08438.JPG

Do you have pictures?
 

picky

Chirping
Jun 17, 2015
38
8
64
That should not happen. My understanding is:

Regular trout is M+M+ li li without any Blue gene.

Blue trout is M+M+ li li Bl (one partially dominant blue gene).

Saxony is M+M+ li li Bl Bl (two blue genes).

However, there seem to be shades of each color, and that can really affect how a duck or drake looks.

I thought the drakelet on the left, below, was a "Blue" harlequin in color because his spots looked grey in color, and because his coloring is so pale as compared to his "Not Blue" brother.
View attachment 1886798
However, when his wing feathers came in, he had bright blue color on his speculum. You can see it peeking out of his wing below (drakelet on the right side). This means he does NOT carry the "Blue" gene - just two harlequin "lih" genes, the same as his brother above. I don't know what makes his color so light compared to a normal harlequin duckling, but it CANNOT be a "blue" gene since he has the blue color on the wing speculum.

Below, you can see the blue color peeking out of his wing (if you make the picture larger). The duckling on the left in this picture is half-harlequin in color and carries a light gene, so probably M+M+ and lih li.

View attachment 1886786

Do you have pictures?

Oh my I want to pretend I understand everything you said but I will read it again. Hahaha. Unfortunately that was years ago like 3 or 4 and I lost them to a predator while they where duckling still so I never got to see their real feathers. But here are some pics of them.
 

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Magnolia Ducks

Free Ranging
Jan 24, 2018
4,612
14,603
572
Magnolia, TX
White can cover any color. So when you cross to a white duck you just don't know what's hiding under the white.

I love duck genetics, because as much as you study, you still get surprises when the eggs hatch!
You are right it's been quite fun seeing what comes out of the egg. That's Barbra Lewis in my avatar and I think she might be blue too, just have to wait for feathers
 

Duck Hill

Songster
5 Years
Jun 17, 2015
380
500
172
South Carolina
Oh my I want to pretend I understand everything you said but I will read it again. Hahaha. Unfortunately that was years ago like 3 or 4 and I lost them to a predator while they where duckling still so I never got to see their real feathers. But here are some pics of them.

That duckling is "brown". Brown has interesting genetics. It is recessive gene. However, it is on the gender gene. Girl ducks have a shorter gender gene from mom, and therefore do not get "brown/not brown" info from mom at all. They do get that info from dad.

Your dad Drake had 1 not-brown gene, making him dark, and one brown gene, which was hidden because it is recessive.

The boy ducklings all got a dark gene from mom and either a dark gene from dad or a hidden brown gene from dad. They all looked dark, because they all had at least one dark gene.

The girl ducklings got a dark gene from dad or a brown gene from dad. They did not get any info on this from mom, because mom's contribution to them was a short "girl" gene without "brown" info.

Your little lighter duckling was a girl duckling with a brown gene from dad. As she had no info from mom, she had to go "brown".

Short version? Brown is a crazy gene. Your duckling was brown and since the mom and dad both looked dark she had to be a girl duckling.
 

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